Sunday, September 29, 2013

Robert De Bruce


Robert De Bruce was born about 1223 in Of Annandale,Dumfrieshire, Scotland as the second child of Robert De Bruce and Isabella Le Scot. He had one sibling, namely: Edward. He died on 31 Mar 1295 in Priory, Lochmaben, Dumfrieshire, Scotland. When he was 17, He married Isabel De Clare,daughter of Gilbert De Clare and Isobel Marshall, on 12 May 1240. When he was 47, He married Christina De Irby about 1270.

Robert De Bruce was buried in Saltre Abbey, near Stilton, Essex. He was known by the title of Lord of Annandale.

Robert De Bruce and Christina De Irby had the following children:

1. Christina Christiana De Bruce was born about 1256 in Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland. She died in 1357 in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, , Scotland.

Robert De Bruce and Isabel De Clare had the following children:

2. Aloisia Bruce was born about 1253 in Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland.

3. Richard Bruce was born about 1249 in Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland.

4. Isabella Bruce was born about 1252 in Argyllshire, Scotland.

5. Bernard Brus Bruce was born about 1247 in Connington, Huntingsonshire, England.

6. William Bruce was born about 1248 in Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland.

7. John Bruce was born about 1252 in Clackmannan, Scotland.

8. Robert Bruce was born in Jul 1243 in Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland. He died about 04 Apr 1304 in Palestine. He married Marjory Margaret of Carrick in 1271 in Turnberry Castle.

Foundation For Medieval Genealogy. Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Kaleen E. Beall, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who Came to America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Other Historical Individuals.

  was one of the 13 claimants to the Throne in 1291  As Lord of Annandale Robert was involved in a competition with John Baliol for the Scottish crown. The arguement went on for a year after the Scottish throne was left vacant following the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway. Robert de Brus claimed the crown was his because he was the grandson of David, Earl of Huntingdon, grandson of King David I, by his youngest daughter, Isabelle. John Baliol claimed the crown was his because he was the great-grandson of David, Earl of Huntingdon through his oldest daughter, Margaret. Since they both had right to the crown they decided to allow King Edward I of England to decide the issue. Because succession passes first to the eldest, King Edward I chose John Baliol. But in 1296 when England attacked Glascony, France, the Scots attacked northern England as part of an alliance Baliol had made with the French, the Auld Alliance. He was removed from the throne and held prisoner in the Tower of London until 1299. Scotland became part of the English kingdom until freed by Robert de Brus's grandson, Robert "the Bruce."
 was one of the 13 claimants to the Throne in 1291
 As Lord of Annandale Robert was involved in a competition with John Baliol for the Scottish crown. The arguement went on for a year after the Scottish throne was left vacant following the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway. Robert de Brus claimed the crown was his because he was the grandson of David, Earl of Huntingdon, grandson of King David I, by his youngest daughter, Isabelle. John Baliol claimed the crown was his because he was the great-grandson of David, Earl of Huntingdon through his oldest daughter, Margaret. Since they both had right to the crown they decided to allow King Edward I of England to decide the issue. Because succession passes first to the eldest, King Edward I chose John Baliol. But in 1296 when England attacked Glascony, France, the Scots attacked northern England as part of an alliance Baliol had made with the French, the Auld Alliance. He was removed from the throne and held prisoner in the Tower of London until 1299. Scotland became part of the English kingdom until freed by Robert de Brus's grandson, Robert "the Bruce."

FMG: ISABEL de Clare (2 Nov 1226-after 10 Jul 1264).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duas filias, Agnetam et Isabellam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brothers[1666].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “IV Non Nov” in 1226 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filia Ysabel”[1667].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in May 1240 of “Isabella filia G. quondam comitis Gloucestriæ” and “Roberto de Brus”[1668].  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Rip" was given "as a marriage portion to Robert de Brus with Isabel, daughter of the earl of Gloucerster…the earl´s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[1669].  m (May 1240) as his first wife, Sir ROBERT de Brus, son of Sir ROBERT de Brus "the Noble" Lord of Annandale & his wife Isabel of Huntingdon (-Lochmaben Castle 31 Mar 1295, bur 17 Apr Guisborough Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1245 as Lord of Annandale.

FMG:

ROBERT [V] de Brus, son of ROBERT [IV] de Brus "the Noble" Lord of Annandale & his wife Isabel of Huntingdon (-Lochmaben Castle 31 Mar 1295, bur 17 Apr Gisburne Priory).  The manuscript history of the Bruce family of Carleton records that “Robertus Brus tertius” succeeded “Robertus Brus secundus” and was buried at Gisburne Priory[989].  The Annales Londonienses name "Robert de Brus" as son of "la secounde fille Davi" and "sire Robert de Brus"[990].  He succeeded his father in 1245 as Lord of Annandale.  He was a claimant to the throne of Scotland in 1291, twelfth in order on the Great Roll of Scotland.  After the court decision in favour of John Balliol, Robert de Brus resigned his claim 7 Nov 1292 in favour of his son Robert[991].  The obituary of Gisburne priory records the death “XI Kal Apr” of "Roberti de Brus quinti"[992], but presumably this date refers to his date of burial at the priory.
m firstly (May 1240) ISABEL de Clare, daughter of GILBERT de Clare Earl of Hertford and Gloucester & his wife Isabel Marshal of Pembroke (2 Nov 1226-after 10 Jul 1264).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duas filias, Agnetam et Isabellam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brothers[993].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “IV Non Nov” in 1226 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filia Ysabel”[994].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in May 1240 of “Isabella filia G. quondam comitis Gloucestriæ” and “Roberto de Brus”[995].  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Rip" was given "as a marriage portion to Robert de Brus with Isabel, daughter of the earl of Gloucerster…the earl´s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[996].
m secondly (before 10 May 1275) as her third husband, CHRISTIAN de Ireby, widow firstly of Sir THOMAS de Lascelles of Bolton, co. Cumberland and secondly of Sir ADAM de Gesemuth of Cramlington, co. Northumberland, daughter and heiress of Sir WILLIAM de Ireby. of Ireby, co. Cumberland & his wife Christian de Hodeholme (-before 6 Jul 1305).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and first marriage has not yet been identified.  A charter dated 29 Aug 1296 records an agreement between "Cristiana widow of Robert de Brus lord of Annandale" and "Robert de Brus his son and heir", granting dower to the former and reserving "her dower from her first husband Adam de Jessemuth´s land in Great Dalton"[997].  Inquisitions dated 14 Sep 1305 (writ 6 Jul 1305) related to the lands of "Cristiana widow of Robert de Brus" noting that she and her husband "died without…heirs [of their bodies]"[998].
Robert [V] & his first wife had two children:
1.         ROBERT [VI] de Brus (Jul 1243-shortly before 4 Apr 1304, bur Abbey of Holm Cultram).  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth in Jul 1243 of “filium nomine ---” to “Isabel de Clara…[et] R. de Brus”[999].  The manuscript history of the Bruce family of Carleton records that “Robertus Brus quartus” succeeded “Robertus Brus tertius”[1000].  He succeeded his father in 1295 as Lord of Annandale.
-        see below.
2.         RICHARD Bruce (-before 26 Jan 1287).  A writ dated 6 May 1287 ordered the restitution of the lands of "Ricardum de Bruse" deceased to "Roberti de Bruse patri sui"[1001].
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