Sunday, September 29, 2013

Gilbert De Clare and Isobel Marshal


Gilbert De Clare was born in 1182 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England as the third child of Richard De Clare and Amice FitzRobert. He had three siblings, namely: Richard Roger, Matilda, and Matilda Maud. He died on 25 Oct 1230 in Penrose, Brittany, France. When he was 35, He married Isobel Marshall,daughter of William Marshal and Isabel De Clare, on 09 Oct 1217.

Gilbert De Clare was known by the title of 5th Earl of Hertford.

Gilbert De Clare and Isobel Marshall had the following children:

1. Gilbert De Clare was born about 1218.

2. Isabel De Clare was born on 08 Nov 1226. She died in 1254. She married Robert De Bruce on 12 May 1240.

3. Agnes De Clare was born about 1224. She died about 1226.

4. Richard De Clare was born on 04 Aug 1222 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. He died on 15 Jul 1262 in Ashenfield Manor, Waltham, Kent, England. He married Margaret Burgh in 1237. He married Maud De Lacy on 26 Jan 1237/38 in Lincolnshire, England.

5.William De Clare was born about 1220.

6. Amicia De Clare was born about 1220. She died in 1284.

Foundation For Medieval Genealogy.   Gilbert de Clare, the son of Richard of Clare, was born in 1180. He married Isabel, the daughter of the Earl of Pembroke.      In 1200, King John became involved in a long-drawn out war with France. This war was expensive and John was forced to introduce new taxes to pay for his army. This created a great deal of resentment in England, and John's position was not helped when, in 1205, the king's army lost control of Normandy, Brittany, Anjou and Maine.     In 1215, King John made another desperate attempt to gain control of his lost territory in France. Once again he was defeated and was forced to pay £40,000 to obtain a truce. When John tried to obtain this money by imposing yet another tax, the barons rebelled.      Gilbert de Clare was one of the leaders of the rebellion. Few barons remained loyal, and in most areas of the country, John had very little support. John had no chance of victory and on 15th June, 1215, at Runnymede in Surrey, he was forced to accept the peace terms of those who had successfully fought against him.     The document the king was obliged to sign was the Magna Carta. In this charter the king made a long list of promises, including no new taxes without the support of his barons, a reduction in the power of his sheriffs and the right of a fair trial for all freemen.     The barons had doubts whether King John could be trusted to keep his word. A small group of barons were given the task of making sure that John kept the promises he had made in the Magna Carta. Two of the barons chosen were Gilbert de Clare and Richard of Clare.     Soon after he signed the charter the king appealed to Pope Innocent III for help. The pope was concerned about this rebellion and decided to excommunicate the barons who had fought against their king. The pope also provided money to help King John recruit foreign mercenaries to fight against his disloyal barons. The civil war resumed. One of King John's main targets was Richard of Clare and in November, 1215, his troops seized his castle at Tonbridge.     The following year King John died and was succeeded by his son Henry III. A year later Richard of Clare also died and Gilbert became the 7th Earl of Clare and the 5th Earl of Hertford. Although the sons of bitter enemies, Gilbert and Henry became close friends and it was not long before the family were given back Tonbridge Castle.     In 1225 Gilbert inherited the estates and the title of the Earl of Gloucester. He also inherited the estates of his grandmother, Maud de St. Hilary. Gilbert de Clare was now the most powerful magnate in England. He controlled 456 manors and when requested, had to supply the king with 260 knights. In 1230, Gilbert de Clare agreed to help Henry III win back land that King John had lost in France.      Gilbert de Clare was killed while fighting in the king's army in Brittany on 25th October, 1230. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford 1st Earl of Gloucester      Plantagenet Crest  Born 1180 Hertford, Hertfordshire, England  Died 25 October 1230 Penrose, Brittany, France  He was the son of Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford, from whom he inherited the Clare estates, from his mother, Amice Fitz Robert, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers. In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War, fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal, whose daughter Isabella he later married. In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Great Charter by Henry III. In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam, who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany, but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranbourgh to Tewkesbury. His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans.     DUE TO THE SIMILARITY OF SPELLING, I FOUND IT NECESSARY TO RESEARCH HEREFORD AND HERTFORD.     I AM NOT SURE WHICH [LACE THE DE CLARES LIVED IN.  HERTFORD IS CLOSER TO LONDON, BUT HEREFORD IS CLOSER TO WALES, WHICH IS WHERE SOME OF THEIR WIVES ETC WERE FROM.     Gloucester is next to hereford, so I am leaning toward hereford.
 Gilbert de Clare, the son of Richard of Clare, was born in 1180. He married Isabel, the daughter of the Earl of Pembroke.

 In 1200, King John became involved in a long-drawn out war with France. This war was expensive and John was forced to introduce new taxes to pay for his army. This created a great deal of resentment in England, and John's position was not helped when, in 1205, the king's army lost control of Normandy, Brittany, Anjou and Maine.

 In 1215, King John made another desperate attempt to gain control of his lost territory in France. Once again he was defeated and was forced to pay £40,000 to obtain a truce. When John tried to obtain this money by imposing yet another tax, the barons rebelled.

 Gilbert de Clare was one of the leaders of the rebellion. Few barons remained loyal, and in most areas of the country, John had very little support. John had no chance of victory and on 15th June, 1215, at Runnymede in Surrey, he was forced to accept the peace terms of those who had successfully fought against him.

 The document the king was obliged to sign was the Magna Carta. In this charter the king made a long list of promises, including no new taxes without the support of his barons, a reduction in the power of his sheriffs and the right of a fair trial for all freemen.

 The barons had doubts whether King John could be trusted to keep his word. A small group of barons were given the task of making sure that John kept the promises he had made in the Magna Carta. Two of the barons chosen were Gilbert de Clare and Richard of Clare.

 Soon after he signed the charter the king appealed to Pope Innocent III for help. The pope was concerned about this rebellion and decided to excommunicate the barons who had fought against their king. The pope also provided money to help King John recruit foreign mercenaries to fight against his disloyal barons. The civil war resumed. One of King John's main targets was Richard of Clare and in November, 1215, his troops seized his castle at Tonbridge.

 The following year King John died and was succeeded by his son Henry III. A year later Richard of Clare also died and Gilbert became the 7th Earl of Clare and the 5th Earl of Hertford. Although the sons of bitter enemies, Gilbert and Henry became close friends and it was not long before the family were given back Tonbridge Castle.

 In 1225 Gilbert inherited the estates and the title of the Earl of Gloucester. He also inherited the estates of his grandmother, Maud de St. Hilary. Gilbert de Clare was now the most powerful magnate in England. He controlled 456 manors and when requested, had to supply the king with 260 knights. In 1230, Gilbert de Clare agreed to help Henry III win back land that King John had lost in France.

 Gilbert de Clare was killed while fighting in the king's army in Brittany on 25th October, 1230.
 Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
 Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford
 1st Earl of Gloucester

 Plantagenet Crest
 Born 1180
 Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
 Died 25 October 1230
 Penrose, Brittany, France
 He was the son of Richard de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford, from whom he inherited the Clare estates, from his mother, Amice Fitz Robert, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers.
 In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War, fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal, whose daughter Isabella he later married. In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Great Charter by Henry III. In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam, who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany, but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranbourgh to Tewkesbury. His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans.

 DUE TO THE SIMILARITY OF SPELLING, I FOUND IT NECESSARY TO RESEARCH HEREFORD AND HERTFORD.

 I AM NOT SURE WHICH [LACE THE DE CLARES LIVED IN.  HERTFORD IS CLOSER TO LONDON, BUT HEREFORD IS CLOSER TO WALES, WHICH IS WHERE SOME OF THEIR WIVES ETC WERE FROM.

 Gloucester is next to hereford, so I am leaning toward hereford.

FMG:SABEL de Clare (2 Nov 1226-after 10 Jul 1264).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duas filias, Agnetam et Isabellam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brothers[1666].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “IV Non Nov” in 1226 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filia Ysabel”[1667].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in May 1240 of “Isabella filia G. quondam comitis Gloucestriæ” and “Roberto de Brus”[1668].  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Rip" was given "as a marriage portion to Robert de Brus with Isabel, daughter of the earl of Gloucerster…the earl´s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[1669].  m (May 1240) as his first wife, Sir ROBERT de Brus, son of Sir ROBERT de Brus "the Noble" Lord of Annandale & his wife Isabel of Huntingdon (-Lochmaben Castle 31 Mar 1295, bur 17 Apr Guisborough Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1245 as Lord of Annandale.

FMG:GILBERT de Clare, son of RICHARD de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford & his wife Amicie of Gloucester ([1180]-Penros, Brittany 25 Oct 1230, bur Tewkesbury).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Gilberto” as son of “Amiciam, Ricardo de Clare nuptam” and his succession as Earl of Gloucester[1637].  He succeeded his father in 1217 as 4th Earl of Hertford.  He was recognised as Earl of Gloucester in Nov 1217 soon after the death of his maternal aunt Isabel Ctss of Gloucester.  The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1230 of "Gilbertus comes Gloverniæ"[1638].  The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1230 of "Gilbertus de Clare comes Gloucestriæ"[1639].  The Annals of Dunstable record that “comes Gloucestriæ” died in 1230[1640].  He died while returning from an expedition to Brittany[1641].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the death “apud Penros in minori Brytannia” in 1230 of “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his burial “in ecclesia nostra de Tewkes”[1642].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “in nocte Sanctorum Crispini et Crispiniani apud Penros in Britannia” of “Gilbertus de Clare comes Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ” and his burial in “ecclesiæ beatæ Mariæ Theokesberiæ”[1643].  The Annals of Worcester record the death in 1230 of “Gilbertus comes Gloucestriæ”[1644].
m (9 Oct 1214 or 1217) as her first husband, ISABEL Marshal, daughter of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare (Pembroke Castle 9 Oct 1200-Berkhamstead Castle, Hertfordshire 15 or 17 Jan 1240, bur Beaulieu Abbey, Hampshire).  The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, names (in order) ”Matilda…Johanna…Isabella” as the daughters of “Willielmi Marescalli comitis Penbrochiæ”[1645].  The same source records in a later passage that "tertia filia…Willihelmi Marescalli…Isabella" married "domino Gilberto de Clare comiti Gloverniæ"[1646].  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the marriage of “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”[1647].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage “die sancti Dionisii” in 1214 of “Isabel filia W Marescalli” and “comiti Glocestriæ et Herefordiæ Gileberto de Clare”[1648].  Her marriage is recorded by Matthew Paris, who names her "Ysabellam comitissam Gloverniæ" sister of William Marshall Earl of Pembroke[1649].  She married secondly (Fawley, Buckinghamshire 30 Mar 1231) Richard Earl of Cornwall.  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage “III Kal Apr…apud Falle juxta Merlawe” in 1231 of “Ysabel comitissa Gloucestriæ” and “Ricardo comiti Cornubiæ, fratri Henrici regis Angliæ”[1650].  The Annales Cambriæ record the marriage in 1231 of "Ricardus comes Cornubiæ" and "Isabellam cometissam Gloucestriæ"[1651].  The Annales Londonienses record the marriage in 1231 of "Ricardus frater regis" and "Isabellam comitissam Gloverniæ, relictam Gileberti de Clare"[1652].  The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1240 of "comitissa Gloverniæ uxor comitis Ricardi" in childbirth[1653].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “XVI Kal Feb…apud Berkhamstede” in 1239 of “Isabella comitissa Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ, Cornubiæ et Pictaviæ” and her burial “apud Bellum Locum Cisterciensis ordinis”[1654].  Matthew Paris records that she died of jaundice contracted in childbirth[1655].
Earl Gilbert & his wife had six children:
1.         AMICE de Clare (27 May 1220-27 Nov, before 21 Jan 1284).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the birth in 1220 of “filiam Amiciam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”[1656].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “VI Kal Jun” in 1220 of “Giliberto de Clare comiti Gloucestriæ filia…Amicia”[1657].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “Baldwinum quartum” married “Amiciam filiam Gilberti de Clare comitis Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ”[1658].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in 1226 of “Amicia filia Gileberti comitis Glocestriæ” and “Baldwino de Ripariis comiti de Wicht”[1659].  "G. de Clare earl of Gloucester" made a fine for the marriage of "his first-born daughter to Baldwin, son of Baldwin de Redvers, son of William de Redvers earl of Devon", dated to [29 Oct] 1226[1660].  She is named as wife of Baldwin by Matthew Paris, who specifies that she was stepdaughter of Richard Earl of Cornwall and names her mother[1661].  Henry III King of England confirmed the betrothal of "Gilebertus de Clare comes Gloucestrie et Hertfordie…filia sua" and "Baldewino filio Baldewini de Riveres filii Willelmi de Riveres comitis Devonie" dated 29 Oct 1226[1662].  The primary source which confirms her possible second marriage has not yet been identified.   The necrology of the Priory of Saint-Martin-des-Champs records the death "V Kal Dec" of "Amitia comitissa Devonie"[1663].  m [firstly] (Betrothed 29 Oct 1226) BALDWIN de Reviers Earl of Devon, son of BALDWIN de Reviers Earl of Devon & his wife Margaret FitzWarin ([1216/17]-15 Feb 1245, bur Breamore Priory, Hampshire).  [m secondly (after 10 Jan 1248) ROBERT de Guines, son of ARNOUL [II] Comte de Guines & his wife Beatrix de Bourbourg (-after 17 Mar 1261).]
2.         RICHARD de Clare (4 Aug 1222-Ashenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury 15 Jul 1262, bur Tonbridge, transferred 28 Jul 1262 to Tewkesbury).  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “II Non Aug” in 1222 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filium…Ricardus”[1664].  He succeeded his father in 1230 as 5th Earl of Hertford and Earl of Gloucester.
-        see below.
3.         AGNES .  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duas filias, Agnetam et Isabellam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brothers[1665].
4.         ISABEL de Clare (2 Nov 1226-after 10 Jul 1264).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duas filias, Agnetam et Isabellam” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brothers[1666].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “IV Non Nov” in 1226 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filia Ysabel”[1667].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in May 1240 of “Isabella filia G. quondam comitis Gloucestriæ” and “Roberto de Brus”[1668].  A charter dated 18 Jun 1240 records that "the town of Rip" was given "as a marriage portion to Robert de Brus with Isabel, daughter of the earl of Gloucerster…the earl´s [G. Marshal Earl of Pembroke] niece"[1669].  m (May 1240) as his first wife, Sir ROBERT de Brus, son of Sir ROBERT de Brus "the Noble" Lord of Annandale & his wife Isabel of Huntingdon (-Lochmaben Castle 31 Mar 1295, bur 17 Apr Guisborough Priory).  He succeeded his father in 1245 as Lord of Annandale.
5.         WILLIAM de Clare (18 May 1228-[23] Jul 1258, bur Tewkesbury Abbey).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duos filios…Willielmum et Gilbertum” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brother[1670].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “XV Kal Jun” in 1228 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ…filius…Willelmus”[1671].  His death is recorded by Matthew Paris, reporting the grief of his brother the Earl of Gloucester[1672].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record that “Willelmus de Clare frater Ricardi de Clare comitis Gloucestriæ et Herteford” was poisoned “X Kal Aug…apud Wyntoniam”, died “apud Reþeresford” and was buried “apud Theokesberiam juxta patrem suum”[1673].
6.         GILBERT de Clare (12 Sep 1229-after 1244).  The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the births of “duos filios…Willielmum et Gilbertum” to “Gilberto…Gloucestriæ et Hertfordiæ comes” and his wife “domina Isabella filia Willielmi Marescalli senioris, comitis de Pembroke”, after the birth of their older brother[1674].  The Annals of Tewkesbury record the birth “II Id Sep die sancti Leonardi” in 1229 of “Gileberto de Clare comiti Glocestriæ filius…Gilebertus”[1675].  Priest.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Isabel Marshal Countess of Hertford; Countess of Cornwall Spouse Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford m. 1217; dec. 1230 Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall m. 1231; wid. 1240 Issue Agnes de Clare Amice de Redvers, Countess of Devon Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford Isabel de Brus, Lady of Annandale William de Clare Gilbert de Clare Henry of Almain Nicholas of Cornwall Father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke Mother Isabel de Clare, 3rd Countess of Pembroke Born 9 October 1200(1200-10-09) Pembroke Castle, Wales Died 17 January 1240 (aged 39) Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire Burial Body: Beaulieu Abbey, Hampshire Heart: Tewkesbury Abbey, Glos. Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240) was a medieval English countess. She was the wife of both Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall (son of King John of England). With the former, she was a great grandparent of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland. Contents [hide]     * 1 Family     * 2 First marriage     * 3 Second marriage     * 4 Death and burial     * 5 Media     * 6 References [edit] Family Born at Pembroke Castle, Isabel was the seventh child, and second daughter, of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare. She had 10 siblings, who included the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Earl's of Pembroke; each of her brothers dying without a legitimate male heir and passing it on to the next brother in line. Her last brother to hold the title of Earl of Pembroke died without legitimate issue, and the title was passed down through the family of Isabel's younger sister Joan. Her sisters married, respectively, the Earls of Norfolk, Surrey, and Derby; the 10th Baron Abergavenny and the Lord of Swanscombe. [edit] First marriage On her 17th birthday, Isabel was married to Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester, who was 20 years her senior, at Tewkesbury Abbey. The marriage was an extremely happy one, despite the age difference, and the couple had six children:     * Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)     * Amice de Clare (1220-1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon     * Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (1222-1262)     * Isabel de Clare (2 November 1226- 10 July 1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale; through this daughter, Isabel would be the great grandmother of Robert the Bruce     * William de Clare (1228-1258)     * Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229), a priest Isabel's husband Gilbert joined in an expedition to Brittany in 1229, but died 25 October 1230 on his way back to Penrose, in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne, to Tewkesbury, where he was buried at the abbey. [edit] Second marriage Isabel was a young widow, only 30 years old. She had proven childbearing ability and the ability to bear healthy sons; as evidenced by her six young children, three of whom were sons. These were most likely the reasons for both the proposal of marriage from Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, and Isabel's acceptance of it, despite the fact that her husband had just died five months previously. The two were married on 30 March 1231 at Fawley Church, much to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry, who had been arranging a more advantageous match for Richard. Isabel and Richard got along well enough, though Richard had a reputation as a womanizer and is known to have had mistresses during the marriage. They were the parents of four children, three of whom died in the cradle.     * John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 - 22 September 1233), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey     * Isabella of Cornwall (9 September 1233 - 10 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey     * Henry of Almain (2 November 1235 - 13 March 1271), murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.     * Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother [edit] Death and burial Isabel died of liver failure, contracted while in childbirth, on 17 January 1240, at Berkhamsted Castle. She was 39 years old. When Isabel was dying she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury Abbey, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey, with her infant son, instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart, in a silver-gilt casket[1], to Tewkesbury. [edit] Media     * Isabel and her husband Richard appear as characters in Virginia Henley's historical novels, The Marriage Prize and The Dragon and the Jewel. [edit] References     * Cokayne, G.E. (2000). The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Alan Sutton.  volume II, page 359 & volume III, page 244     * The Dictionary of National Biography     * Denholm-Young, Noel. Richard of Cornwall, 1947
 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 Jump to: navigation, search
 Isabel Marshal
 Countess of Hertford; Countess of Cornwall
 Spouse Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford
 m. 1217; dec. 1230
 Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall
 m. 1231; wid. 1240
 Issue
 Agnes de Clare
 Amice de Redvers, Countess of Devon
 Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford
 Isabel de Brus, Lady of Annandale
 William de Clare
 Gilbert de Clare
 Henry of Almain
 Nicholas of Cornwall
 Father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke
 Mother Isabel de Clare, 3rd Countess of Pembroke
 Born 9 October 1200(1200-10-09)
 Pembroke Castle, Wales
 Died 17 January 1240 (aged 39)
 Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire
 Burial Body: Beaulieu Abbey, Hampshire
 Heart: Tewkesbury Abbey, Glos.

 Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240) was a medieval English countess. She was the wife of both Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall (son of King John of England). With the former, she was a great grandparent of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland.
 Contents
 [hide]

 * 1 Family
 * 2 First marriage
 * 3 Second marriage
 * 4 Death and burial
 * 5 Media
 * 6 References

 [edit] Family

 Born at Pembroke Castle, Isabel was the seventh child, and second daughter, of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare. She had 10 siblings, who included the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Earl's of Pembroke; each of her brothers dying without a legitimate male heir and passing it on to the next brother in line. Her last brother to hold the title of Earl of Pembroke died without legitimate issue, and the title was passed down through the family of Isabel's younger sister Joan. Her sisters married, respectively, the Earls of Norfolk, Surrey, and Derby; the 10th Baron Abergavenny and the Lord of Swanscombe.
 [edit] First marriage

 On her 17th birthday, Isabel was married to Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester, who was 20 years her senior, at Tewkesbury Abbey. The marriage was an extremely happy one, despite the age difference, and the couple had six children:

 * Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
 * Amice de Clare (1220-1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
 * Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (1222-1262)
 * Isabel de Clare (2 November 1226- 10 July 1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale; through this daughter, Isabel would be the great grandmother of Robert the Bruce
 * William de Clare (1228-1258)
 * Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229), a priest

 Isabel's husband Gilbert joined in an expedition to Brittany in 1229, but died 25 October 1230 on his way back to Penrose, in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne, to Tewkesbury, where he was buried at the abbey.
 [edit] Second marriage

 Isabel was a young widow, only 30 years old. She had proven childbearing ability and the ability to bear healthy sons; as evidenced by her six young children, three of whom were sons. These were most likely the reasons for both the proposal of marriage from Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, and Isabel's acceptance of it, despite the fact that her husband had just died five months previously. The two were married on 30 March 1231 at Fawley Church, much to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry, who had been arranging a more advantageous match for Richard. Isabel and Richard got along well enough, though Richard had a reputation as a womanizer and is known to have had mistresses during the marriage. They were the parents of four children, three of whom died in the cradle.

 * John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 - 22 September 1233), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
 * Isabella of Cornwall (9 September 1233 - 10 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
 * Henry of Almain (2 November 1235 - 13 March 1271), murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.
 * Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother

 [edit] Death and burial

 Isabel died of liver failure, contracted while in childbirth, on 17 January 1240, at Berkhamsted Castle. She was 39 years old.

 When Isabel was dying she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury Abbey, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey, with her infant son, instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart, in a silver-gilt casket[1], to Tewkesbury.
 [edit] Media

 * Isabel and her husband Richard appear as characters in Virginia Henley's historical novels, The Marriage Prize and The Dragon and the Jewel.

 [edit] References

 * Cokayne, G.E. (2000). The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Alan Sutton.  volume II, page 359 & volume III, page 244
 * The Dictionary of National Biography
 * Denholm-Young, Noel. Richard of Cornwall, 1947





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