Monday, December 15, 2014

William Leslie (d. 1513)-Margaret Balfour

 Complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and ..., Volume 6  By George Edward Cokayne says he was never formally invested with the earldom.

 says he was never formally invested with the earldom.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Leslie, 3rd Earl of Rothes, was the son of Andrew Leslie, Master of Rothes, and Marjory (also known as Elizabeth) Sinclair, daughter of William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness. He succeeded his elder brother George as Earl in 1513.
As George had tried to sell the family lands without royal permission William was trying to recover his rights, especially over the Barony centred on Ballinbreich Castle. However, he was killed at the battle of Flodden.
William married Margaret Balfour, his heir was George Leslie, 4th Earl of Rothes. Their other children included John Leslie of Parkhill who was captured at the battle of Solway Moss, and James Leslie, Parson of Rothes.[1]


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References
[edit]

  Leslie, Charles Joseph, Historical records of the family of Leslie from 1067 to 1868-9, vol.2, Edinburgh (1869), pp.41-46

http://www.thepeerage.com/p2813.htm

There is a tree in:
Americans of Royal Descent: A Collection of Genealogies of American Families Whose Lineage is Traced to the Legimate Issue of Kings
Charles Henry Browning
Porter & Costes, 1891

Marjory Elizabeth Sinclair( d. 1508) and Andrew Leslie(d. c. 1473)

 Historical records of the family of Leslie from 1067 to 1868-9: ... - Page 31  Charles Joseph Leslie - 1869

 Andrew, Master of Rothes, was the only son of George, first Earl of Rothes, by his second wife, Christian Halyburton. King James II granted a charter to Sir Andrew Leslie, knight, son and heir of George, Earl of Rothes, of the lands and barony of Tacis in Fife, and of the lands and barony of Rothynorman in Aberdeenshire, proceeding on the resignation of the same by George, Earl of Rothes, dated 16th November, an. Reg.23, A.D. 1458. Andrew, Master of Rothes, married Lady Marjory Sinclair, daughter of William, third Earl of Orkney and Caithness, Lord Sinclair. By her he had issue-- 1.John 2. George 3.William Andrew, Master of Rothes, died about 1486, during the lifetime of his father, George, first Earl of Rothes, as is proved by the command given by King James III already mentioned, dated 12th February 1487, orderig the Earl of Rothes sufficient means for support while attending the king.
 Historical records of the family of Leslie from 1067 to 1868-9: ... - Page 31

 Charles Joseph Leslie - 1869

 Andrew, Master of Rothes, was the only son of George, first Earl of Rothes, by his second wife, Christian Halyburton. King James II granted a charter to Sir Andrew Leslie, knight, son and heir of George, Earl of Rothes, of the lands and barony of Tacis in Fife, and of the lands and barony of Rothynorman in Aberdeenshire, proceeding on the resignation of the same by George, Earl of Rothes, dated 16th November, an. Reg.23, A.D. 1458.

 Andrew, Master of Rothes, married Lady Marjory Sinclair, daughter of William, third Earl of Orkney and Caithness, Lord Sinclair. By her he had issue--

 1.John
 2. George
 3.William
 Andrew, Master of Rothes, died about 1486, during the lifetime of his father, George, first Earl of Rothes, as is proved by the command given by King James III already mentioned, dated 12th February 1487, orderig the Earl of Rothes sufficient means for support while attending the king.


The Magna charta barons and their American descendants with the ... - Page 155
Charles Henry Browning - 1898
and Historical records of the family of Leslie from 1067 to 1868-9: ... - Page 31


Charles Joseph Leslie - 1869Gives her name as Marjory.

Sigurd Snake-eye or Serpent in the Eye

 

Sigurd Snake-eye was one of the sons of Ragnar Lodbrok and Kraka. When his father died, he inherited Skåne, Halland, the Danish islands, and Viken. He was considered to be the grand-father of Gorm the Old.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sigurd Snake-in-the-eye (Old Norse: Sigurðr ormr í auga) was one of the four sons of Ragnar Lodbrok. What some would say what "set him apart from his brothers" was that he was born with the image of theOuroboros, as some would see a "snake biting its own tail, encircling the pupil of his left eye" type of mark. This had been prophesised by his mother Kraka - Aslaug, the daughter of the Valkyrie Brynhildr. As a boy Sigurd was close to his father and accompanied Ragnar on a hazardous expedition through Russia to the Hellespont. Later on in life he is said to have sojourned for a time in Scotland and the Scottish Islands.


In 865 King Ella of Northumbria killed Ragnar Lodbrok in a pit of serpents. When Ragnar was suffering in the pit he is reputed to have exclaimed: "How the young pigs would squeal if they knew what the old boar suffers!"


And soon his sons did know, as King Ella was foolish enough to send an embassy to acquaint them of the fact. When the brothers heard of their father's death Sigurd is said to have cut himself to the bone with a knife he held in his hand and his brother Björn Ironside gripped his spear so tightly that the imprint of his fingers was left in the wood.


Sigurd and his brothers swore they would avenge his killing in time-honoured Viking tradition. The legend says that their first attempt failed, but through the treachery of the oldest brother, the notoriously cruel and cunning Ivar the Boneless, Ella was duped into a battle he could not win. In 866 they crossed the North Sea with a large army. This Great Heathen Army sacked York, met King Ella in battle and captured him. They sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood Eagle), an exceedingly painful death. It consisted of cutting away the ribs from the spine and pulling the lungs backward through the cavities formed to form the shape of an eagle.


1 Sigurd's descendants
1.1 Harthacanute and his descendents
1.2 Aslaug and her son Sigurd Hart
2 Sources

Sigurd's descendants[edit]


Ragnarssona þáttr informs that when his father died, he inherited Zealand, Scania, Halland, the Danish islands, and Viken. He married Blaeja, the daughter of king Ælla of Northumbria and they had the childrenHarthacanute and Aslaug, who was named after her grandmother Aslaug.
Harthacanute and his descendents[edit]


Harthacanute succeeded Sigurd as the king of Zealand, Scania and Halland, but he lost Viken. He was the father of Gorm the Old, the king of Denmark. Gorm succeeded his father as king and married Thyra, the daughter of the Jutish chieftain Harald Klak. When Harald died, Gorm took his kingdom too and united Denmark.


Harald succeeded his father as king and married Gyrid of Sweden. They had a son named Sweyn Forkbeard. Sweyn succeeded his father as king and married Gunhild. They had a son named Cnut the Great. Sweyn also ruled England in his lifetime and established the Danish Empire. When Sweyn died, his elder son Harald Svendsen became King Denmark as England's former king Ethelred reclaimed it. However as Harald did not marry, his brother Cnut the great became king, re-established the Danish Empire and married Emma of Normandy. They had a son named Harthacnut. When Cnut died, Harthacnut became king of the Danish Empire, however, he lost England to Edward the confessor in 1042. As he did not get married, Sigurd's bloodline ended.
Aslaug and her son Sigurd Hart[edit]


Sigurd's daughter Aslaug married Helgi the Sharp (the great-great-grandson of king Ring of Ringerike) of the Dagling dynasty. They had the son Sigurd Hart, who married Ingeborg, the daughter of the Jutishchieftain Harald Klak. Sigurd Hart and Ingeborg had the children Guttorm and Ragnhild. When his uncle king Fróði of Ringerike died, Sigurd Hart went to Norway to succeed him as king.


Ragnarssona þáttr and Heimskringla relate that a berserker from Hadeland named Haki (Hake) killed Sigurd Hart, but lost a hand in the fight. Then Haki went to Sigurd Hart's residence at Stein and took Sigurd's children Ragnhild and Guttorm. Haki returned with the children and all the loot to Hadeland. Before Haki (Hake) recuperated from his wounds and could marry the 15 year old Ragnhild, she was captured a second time, by Halfdan the Black. Halfdan and Ragnhild were the parents of Harald Fairhair.


Archaeologia, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity, Volume 24

Society of Antiquaries of London

The Society, 1832 - Great Britain


As early as the beginning of the ninth century, Ragnar Lodbrog is reported to have visited the Hellepont, and before the middle of the eleventh century the expedition of Harald Hardraad to the East, his amour with the Empress Zoe, and his escape from prison by means of the Varangian guards, are matters of historical record. The early establishment of thes Varangians as the Imperial Guard, (who were, undoubtedly, Scandinavians, and who play so principal a part in Sir Walter Scott's recent novel of Count Robert.) would of itself argue an intimate connexion between the Greeks and Northmen, and this is corroborated by perpetual notices in the Sagas. The share also taken by the Northmen in the first Crusade, is an additional argument of the acquaintance with the oriental world. But as the game of chess certainly passed from Asia to Europe, and probably through more channels than one, it is of very minor importance to inquire more minutely form what quarter the inhabitants of the North received it. In proof of the ancient usage of chess among them, I shall therefore content myself by adducing such passabes of the old northern writers as have occurred to me in this inquiry. In the Saga of Ragnar Lodbrog, printed in Biorner's collection, and in an ancient account of the Danish invasions of Northumberland in the ninth century, intitled Nordymbra, it is stated, that after the death of Ragnar, messengers were sent to his sons in Denmark by King Aella, to communicate the intelligence, and to mark their behavior when they received it. They were found thus occupied:"Sigurd Snake's-eye played at chess(sitia at hnef-table) with Huitserk the Bold; but Bjorn Ironside was polishing the shaft of a spear in the middle of the hall. As the messengers proceeded with their story, Huitserk and Sigurd dropped their game (lata thegar falla nithr taflit), and listened to what was said with great attention; Ivar put various questions; and Bjorn leant on the spear he was furbishing. But when the messengers came to the death of the chief, and told his expiring words, that the young boars would gnash their tusks (literally, grunt) if they knew their parent's fate, Bjorn grasped the handle of his spear so tight, with emotion, that the marks of his fingers remained on it, and when the tale was finished, dashed it to pieces. Huitserk compressed a chessman he had taken so forcibly with his fingers, that the blood started forth from each; whilst Sigurd Snake's -eye, paring his nails with a knife, was so wrapt up in attention, that he cut himself to the bone without feeling it."



Fragments of English and Irish history in the ninth and tenth century: in two parts

John Nichols


Printed by and for John Nichols, 1788 - Great Britain The sons of Ragnar Lodbrook infested many regions, as England, France, Italy, and Lombardy. It is said that they came at last to the town called Lucca, which they took; and proposed to go to Rome and subdue it. Their actions are famous above all that spoke the Danish tongue.


Being returned to Denmark, they divided their inheritance. Biorne Ironside had the kingdom of Upsal, all Sweden, and the subject regions.


Sigurn Snake's-eye had Seland with Sconen, Halland, Vik, and Agdes even to Lidandesness, with a part of Upland. Huitserk had Reidgothland, and Vindland.


Sigurd Snake's-eye married Blaea, daughter of king Ella, by whom he had Aflauga and Knut.


Aflauga, twin with her brother, was the mother of Sigurg the Stag, the father of Ragnhilda, the mother of Harald Harfagre, first king of all Norway.


Ragnvald (or Rognvald) "the Mountain-High" Olafsson

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  This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009)

 Ragnvald (or Rognvald) "the Mountain-High" Olafsson was a petty king of Vestfold in what is today Norway. He was the son of Olaf Geirstad-Alf.

 His greatest contribution to posterity was that he asked the skald Þjóðólfr of Hvinir to compose a poem about his ancestry. This poem is known as Ynglingatal and is not only one of the oldest, but also one of the most famous and debated of the Old Norse poems.

 Þjóðólfr ended the poem with these lines:

     Under the heaven's blue dome, a name
     I never knew more true to fame
     Than Rognvald bore; whose skilful hand
     Could tame the scorners of the land, --
     Rognvald, who knew so well to guide
     The wild sea-horses through the tide:
     The "Mountain-high" was the proud name
     By which the king was known to fame.

 The 13th century history Heimskringla, which used Ynglingatal as a source but contains much additional material that is not considered reliable, makes him a cousin of Harald Fairhair, while late and dubious pedigree material assigns him a daughter Åsa Ragnvaldsdatter (Aseda Rognvaldsdatter), who married Eystein Ivarsson. As a purported ancestor to William the Conqueror, it would be through this connection with Ivarsson that the current British royal family traces its roots all the way back to the Yngling bloodline mentioned in, among other sources, Beowulf.

Richard I of Normandy

BIOGRAPHY: acceded  942.  !NOTE: Submitted by Leo Van De Pas, Ancestors of William I "The  !NOTE: Royal & Noble Genealogical Data On the Normandy, Richard I the Fearless of, Duke of Normandy 3rd  Born: 933, Fecamp, France Acceded: 942 Died: 20 NOV 996, Fecamp, France  Father: Normandy, William I LONGSWORD of, Duke of Normany 2nd Mother: Senlis, Sprota (Adela) of Married 960 to Paris, Emma of Married to Crêpon, Gunnor of   Child 1: Normandy, Richard II the Good of, Duke of Normany 4th Child 2: , Mauger of Corbeil, Earl of Corbeil Child 3: , Robert of Evereaux, Count, Bishop of Rouen Child 4: , Matilda Child 5: , Emma of Normandy, b. CIR 986 Child 6: , Hedwig (Hawise) Child 7: , Beatrix of Normandy Child 8: , Godfrey of Brionne & Eu Child 9: Hiesmes, William of, Count of Eu From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. You have new messages (diff). Jump to: navigation, search Richard I of Normandy (c.935 - November 20, 996) was the Duke of Normandy from 942 to 996. He was called Richard the Fearless (French, Sans Peur).  Contents [hide] 1 Birth  2 Life  3 Marriages  4 Mistresses  5 Death  6 Sources     [edit] Birth He was born to William I of Normandy, Duke of Normandy, and Sprota. His date of birth is unknown, but he was still a boy when his father died in 942. His mother was a Breton concubine captured in war and bound to William by a Danish marriage. After William died, Sprota became the wife of Esperleng, a wealthy miller.  [edit] Life Richard was still a boy when his father died, and so he was powerless to stop Louis IV of France when he seized Normandy. Richard escaped from his prison at Laon, allied himself with Norman and Viking leaders, drove Louis out of Rouen, and took back Normandy by 947.  [edit] Marriages He was first married to Emma of Paris (Duchess of Normandy) in 960. She died after 966, with no issue.  According to Robert of Torigny, not long after Emma's death, Duke Richard went out hunting and stopped at the house of a local forester. He became enamoured of the forester's wife, Seinfreda, but she being a virtuous woman, suggested he court her unmarried sister, Gunnor, instead. Gunnor became his bride, and her family rose to prominence. Her brother, Herefast de Crepon, was involved in a controversial trial involving the Cathars. She was, like Richard, of Norse descent, being a Dane by blood. Richard finally married her to legitimate their children:  Richard II, Duke of Normandy (The Good),  Robert, Archbishop of Rouen, Count of Evreux, died 1037.  Mauger, Earl of Corbeil, died after 1033.  Robert Danus, died between 985/989.  Emma of Normandy, died 1052.  Hawise of Normandy, wife of Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany.  Maud of Normandy, wife of Odo II of Blois, Count of Blois, Champagne and Chartres.  [edit] Mistresses Richard was known to have had several mistresses and produced childen with many of them. Known children are:  Geoffrey, Count of Brionne, (b. ca. 970)  Hawise (b. ca. 978), d. 21 Feb 1034. m. Geoffrey of Brittany, Duke of Brittany, (ca. 997), son of Conan I of Brittany, Duke of Brittany, "le Tort", and Ermengarde of Anjou.  William d'Eu, Count d'Eu, (b. ca. 985).     [edit] Death He died in Fecamp, France on November 20, 996 of natural causes.  [edit] Sources McKitterick, Rosamund. The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987, 1993.  Searle, Eleanor. Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066, 1998.  http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942 RICHARD I 942-996  RICHARD, son of GUILLAUME Comte [ de Normandie] & his first wife Sprota --- (Fécamp [932]-Fécamp 20 Nov 996, bur Fécamp[71]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names Richard as son of Guillaume and Sprota, recording that news of his birth was brought to his father when he was returning from his victory against the rebels led by "Riulf"[72].  Flodoard records "filio ipsius Willelmi, nato de concubina Brittana" being granted the land of the Normans by King Louis after his father's death[73].  Richard is described as "a boy" on the death of his father by Dudo of Saint-Quentin[74], and as "ten years old" at the time by Orderic Vitalis[75]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Richard succeeded his father under the guardianship of "Bernard le Danois"[76].  After the death of Richard's father, Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France briefly controlled Rouen, and kept Richard prisoner, before the latter was able to escape[77], whereupon he succeeded as RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte [de Normandie].  He used the title Comte de Rouen/comes Rothomagensium, and from 966 Marquis des Normands/marchio Normannorum[78].  Soon after succeeding, he suppressed the rebellion of Rodulf "Torta", who was banished and fled to Paris[79].  These events are not dated, but are recounted with the betrothal of Richard to the daughter of Hugues Duc des Francs, which took place in 945.  His forces defeated the army of Otto I King of Germany after it attempted to capture Rouen in revenge for the escape of comte Richard from captivity[80].  Comte Richard defeated French forces after King Lothaire of France captured Evreux.  Hugues "le Grand" Duc des Francs nominated comte Richard as guardian of his son, the future Hugues "Capet" King of France, in 956, the arrangement being confirmed by Richard's betrothal to Hugues's sister[81].  He invited William of Volpiano, Italian abbot of Saint-Bénigne at Dijon, to reform the Norman abbeys, installing monks at Mont-Saint-Michel and Fécamp[82].  He agreed a non-aggression pact with Æthelred II King of England 1 Mar 991, designed no doubt to prevent either side from sheltering Viking marauders[83].  "Ricardus filius Willelmi, dux Normannie" founded Louviers "in Ebroicensi pago" by undated charter[84].  Guillaume de Jumièges records the death of Duke Richard at Fécamp in 996[85].  m firstly (betrothed 956, Rouen 960) EMMA, daughter of HUGUES "le Grand" Duc des Francs, Comte de Paris & his third wife Hedwig of Germany ([943]-after 19 Mar 968).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage in 956 of "Richardus filius Guillelmi principis Normannorum" with "filiam Hugonis ducis", although she is not named[86].  Guillaume de Jumièges records the betrothal of Emma daughter of Hugues to Richard, arranged at the same time her father appointed her future husband as guardian of her brother Hugues, the future Hugues "Capet" King of France, and in a later passage records their marriage at Rouen after the death of her father[87].  No direct proof has yet been identified that Emma was the daughter of her father's third marriage.  However, this is likely given that betrothals at the time normally took place when the female partner was in early adolescence.  Guillaume de Jumièges records the death of Emma without children[88].  m secondly ([before 989]) GUNNORA, daughter of --- ([950]-5 Jan 1031).  Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Duke Richard and "Gunnor, issue d'une très-noble famille danoise" soon after the death of his first wife[89].  According to Robert de Torigny, the marriage took place to legitimise Richard and Gunnora's son Robert to permit his appointment as Bishop of Rouen[90].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gunnor" as the wife of "dux Normannie primus Richardus"[91].  It appears from Dudo de Saint-Quentin that Gunnora was Richard I's mistress before she married him.  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1024/26], subscribed by "…Gonnor matris comitis…"[92].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1030 of "Gunnor comitissa uxor primi Ricardi"[93].  The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "Non Jan" of "Gonnoridis…comitissa Normannie"[94].
 BIOGRAPHY: acceded  942.

 !NOTE: Submitted by Leo Van De Pas, Ancestors of William I "The

 !NOTE: Royal & Noble Genealogical Data On the
 Normandy, Richard I the Fearless of, Duke of Normandy 3rd

 Born: 933, Fecamp, France
 Acceded: 942
 Died: 20 NOV 996, Fecamp, France

 Father: Normandy, William I LONGSWORD of, Duke of Normany 2nd
 Mother: Senlis, Sprota (Adela) of
 Married 960 to Paris, Emma of
 Married to Crêpon, Gunnor of


 Child 1: Normandy, Richard II the Good of, Duke of Normany 4th
 Child 2: , Mauger of Corbeil, Earl of Corbeil
 Child 3: , Robert of Evereaux, Count, Bishop of Rouen
 Child 4: , Matilda
 Child 5: , Emma of Normandy, b. CIR 986
 Child 6: , Hedwig (Hawise)
 Child 7: , Beatrix of Normandy
 Child 8: , Godfrey of Brionne & Eu
 Child 9: Hiesmes, William of, Count of Eu
 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
 You have new messages (diff).
 Jump to: navigation, search
 Richard I of Normandy (c.935 - November 20, 996) was the Duke of Normandy from 942 to 996. He was called Richard the Fearless (French, Sans Peur).

 Contents [hide]
 1 Birth
 2 Life
 3 Marriages
 4 Mistresses
 5 Death
 6 Sources



 [edit]
 Birth
 He was born to William I of Normandy, Duke of Normandy, and Sprota. His date of birth is unknown, but he was still a boy when his father died in 942. His mother was a Breton concubine captured in war and bound to William by a Danish marriage. After William died, Sprota became the wife of Esperleng, a wealthy miller.

 [edit]
 Life
 Richard was still a boy when his father died, and so he was powerless to stop Louis IV of France when he seized Normandy. Richard escaped from his prison at Laon, allied himself with Norman and Viking leaders, drove Louis out of Rouen, and took back Normandy by 947.

 [edit]
 Marriages
 He was first married to Emma of Paris (Duchess of Normandy) in 960. She died after 966, with no issue.

 According to Robert of Torigny, not long after Emma's death, Duke Richard went out hunting and stopped at the house of a local forester. He became enamoured of the forester's wife, Seinfreda, but she being a virtuous woman, suggested he court her unmarried sister, Gunnor, instead. Gunnor became his bride, and her family rose to prominence. Her brother, Herefast de Crepon, was involved in a controversial trial involving the Cathars. She was, like Richard, of Norse descent, being a Dane by blood. Richard finally married her to legitimate their children:

 Richard II, Duke of Normandy (The Good),
 Robert, Archbishop of Rouen, Count of Evreux, died 1037.
 Mauger, Earl of Corbeil, died after 1033.
 Robert Danus, died between 985/989.
 Emma of Normandy, died 1052.
 Hawise of Normandy, wife of Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany.
 Maud of Normandy, wife of Odo II of Blois, Count of Blois, Champagne and Chartres.
 [edit]
 Mistresses
 Richard was known to have had several mistresses and produced childen with many of them. Known children are:

 Geoffrey, Count of Brionne, (b. ca. 970)
 Hawise (b. ca. 978), d. 21 Feb 1034. m. Geoffrey of Brittany, Duke of Brittany, (ca. 997), son of Conan I of Brittany, Duke of Brittany, "le Tort", and Ermengarde of Anjou.
 William d'Eu, Count d'Eu, (b. ca. 985).



 [edit]
 Death
 He died in Fecamp, France on November 20, 996 of natural causes.

 [edit]
 Sources
 McKitterick, Rosamund. The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987, 1993.
 Searle, Eleanor. Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066, 1998.

 http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htm#GuillaumeIdied942

 RICHARD I 942-996



 RICHARD, son of GUILLAUME Comte [ de Normandie] & his first wife Sprota --- (Fécamp [932]-Fécamp 20 Nov 996, bur Fécamp[71]).  Guillaume de Jumièges names Richard as son of Guillaume and Sprota, recording that news of his birth was brought to his father when he was returning from his victory against the rebels led by "Riulf"[72].  Flodoard records "filio ipsius Willelmi, nato de concubina Brittana" being granted the land of the Normans by King Louis after his father's death[73].  Richard is described as "a boy" on the death of his father by Dudo of Saint-Quentin[74], and as "ten years old" at the time by Orderic Vitalis[75]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Richard succeeded his father under the guardianship of "Bernard le Danois"[76].  After the death of Richard's father, Louis IV "d'Outremer" King of France briefly controlled Rouen, and kept Richard prisoner, before the latter was able to escape[77], whereupon he succeeded as RICHARD I "Sans Peur" Comte [de Normandie].  He used the title Comte de Rouen/comes Rothomagensium, and from 966 Marquis des Normands/marchio Normannorum[78].  Soon after succeeding, he suppressed the rebellion of Rodulf "Torta", who was banished and fled to Paris[79].  These events are not dated, but are recounted with the betrothal of Richard to the daughter of Hugues Duc des Francs, which took place in 945.  His forces defeated the army of Otto I King of Germany after it attempted to capture Rouen in revenge for the escape of comte Richard from captivity[80].  Comte Richard defeated French forces after King Lothaire of France captured Evreux.  Hugues "le Grand" Duc des Francs nominated comte Richard as guardian of his son, the future Hugues "Capet" King of France, in 956, the arrangement being confirmed by Richard's betrothal to Hugues's sister[81].  He invited William of Volpiano, Italian abbot of Saint-Bénigne at Dijon, to reform the Norman abbeys, installing monks at Mont-Saint-Michel and Fécamp[82].  He agreed a non-aggression pact with Æthelred II King of England 1 Mar 991, designed no doubt to prevent either side from sheltering Viking marauders[83].  "Ricardus filius Willelmi, dux Normannie" founded Louviers "in Ebroicensi pago" by undated charter[84].  Guillaume de Jumièges records the death of Duke Richard at Fécamp in 996[85].

 m firstly (betrothed 956, Rouen 960) EMMA, daughter of HUGUES "le Grand" Duc des Francs, Comte de Paris & his third wife Hedwig of Germany ([943]-after 19 Mar 968).  The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage in 956 of "Richardus filius Guillelmi principis Normannorum" with "filiam Hugonis ducis", although she is not named[86].  Guillaume de Jumièges records the betrothal of Emma daughter of Hugues to Richard, arranged at the same time her father appointed her future husband as guardian of her brother Hugues, the future Hugues "Capet" King of France, and in a later passage records their marriage at Rouen after the death of her father[87].  No direct proof has yet been identified that Emma was the daughter of her father's third marriage.  However, this is likely given that betrothals at the time normally took place when the female partner was in early adolescence.  Guillaume de Jumièges records the death of Emma without children[88].

 m secondly ([before 989]) GUNNORA, daughter of --- ([950]-5 Jan 1031).  Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Duke Richard and "Gunnor, issue d'une très-noble famille danoise" soon after the death of his first wife[89].  According to Robert de Torigny, the marriage took place to legitimise Richard and Gunnora's son Robert to permit his appointment as Bishop of Rouen[90].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gunnor" as the wife of "dux Normannie primus Richardus"[91].  It appears from Dudo de Saint-Quentin that Gunnora was Richard I's mistress before she married him.  "Duke Richard [II]" donated property to the abbey of Mont Saint-Michel by charter dated to [1024/26], subscribed by "…Gonnor matris comitis…"[92].  Robert of Torigny records the death in 1030 of "Gunnor comitissa uxor primi Ricardi"[93].  The necrology of Saint-Père-en-Vallée records the death "Non Jan" of "Gonnoridis…comitissa Normannie"[94].

Godfrey of Brionne

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htmRichard

Richard  had five illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:
9.          GEOFFREY [Godfroy] de Brionne ([953]-[1015]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis”[144].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[145].  He is named son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[146].  Comte d'Eu after 996.  
-        COMTES d'EU.
http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc384196822

GEOFFROY de Brionne, illegitimate son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- ([953]-[1015]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis”[2227].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[2228].  He is named as son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[2229].  Comte d'Eu after 996.
m ---.  The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known.
Geoffroy & his wife had [two] children:
1.         GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" ([979/1000]-murdered [Mar] [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis” inherited his father´s county before he was killed[2230].  Named as son of "Godfrey" by Orderic Vitalis[2231].  Comte d'Eu.  "Gislebertus filius Godefridi comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[2232].  Orderic Vitalis records that “tempore Rodberti ducis Gislebertus comes Brionniæ” invaded “in pagum Vimmacensem” [Vimeu] but was repulsed by “Ingelrannus Pontivi comes”, adding that “miles...Herluinus” fled the battle and afterwards founded “in patrimonio suo in loco...Beccus...cœnobium sanctæ Dei genitricis Mariæ”[2233].  Le Prévost dates this event to “antérieure à 1034, époque présumée de la fondation du Bec”[2234].  He was appointed guardian of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after the death in 1040 of Alain III Duke of Brittany[2235].  He was murdered by his cousin Raoul de Waco, after which Brionne was kept by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2236].  On the other hand, another passage in Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Witot” had been exiled “propter occisionem Gisleberti comitis”[2237].  Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[2238].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi”[2239].  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis", undated but listed among other deaths recorded in Mar[2240].  m ---.  The name of Gilbert's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had four children:
a)         RICHARD de Brionne (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[2241].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2242].  He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2243].  Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2244].  Lord of Clare and Tonbridge.  Regent of England 1075.  
-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY.
b)         GUILLAUME de Brionne (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "Milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 29 Aug 1060, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2245].
c)         BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richardum et Balduinum” as the two sons of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2246].  He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2247].  Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2248].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2249].  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England built a castle within the walls of Exeter, after he suppressed the town´s rebellion, and appointed “Balduinum de Molis filium Gisleberti comitis” as custodian, dated to early 1067[2250].  After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon.  “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[2251].  Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086.  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[2252].  m ALBERADE, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[2253].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2254].  Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained.  Baudouin & his wife had six children:
i)          ROBERT (-after Dec 1101).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2255].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2256].  Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy.  The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont[2257].  He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096.  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2258].
ii)         WILLIAM (-1096).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2259].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2260].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.
iii)        RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Forde Abbey).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2261].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2262].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2263].  He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton.  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless[2264].  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2265].
iv)       ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Forde Abbey, Devon).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2266].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2267].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford”[2268].  m ---.  One child:
(a)       ALICE .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ”[2269].  m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---.
v)        EMMA .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2270].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m HUGH de Waft, son of ---.
vi)       daughter .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2271].
Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
vii)       WIGER (-[1133]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”, adding that Wiger became a monk at Bec where he lived for about 40 years under abbots Guillaume and Boson[2272].
d)         ADELA ).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2273].  m NEEL Vicomte [de Cotentin], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-Aug 1092).
2.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child:
a)         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus comes Brionnæ nepos Ricardi ducis Normannorum" married "neptem suam" to “Baldrico Teutonico”, who had come “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II][2274].  Her exact parentage is not known.  m BALDRIC, son of --- (-before 1053).

Gilbert of Brionne and Herlette DeFalaise

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMANDY.htmRichard

Richard  had five illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:
9.          GEOFFREY [Godfroy] de Brionne ([953]-[1015]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis”[144].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[145].  He is named son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[146].  Comte d'Eu after 996.  
-        COMTES d'EU.
http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc384196822

GEOFFROY de Brionne, illegitimate son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his mistress --- ([953]-[1015]).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis”[2227].  Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[2228].  He is named as son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[2229].  Comte d'Eu after 996.
m ---.  The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known.
Geoffroy & his wife had [two] children:
1.         GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" ([979/1000]-murdered [Mar] [1040]).  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis” inherited his father´s county before he was killed[2230].  Named as son of "Godfrey" by Orderic Vitalis[2231].  Comte d'Eu.  "Gislebertus filius Godefridi comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[2232].  Orderic Vitalis records that “tempore Rodberti ducis Gislebertus comes Brionniæ” invaded “in pagum Vimmacensem” [Vimeu] but was repulsed by “Ingelrannus Pontivi comes”, adding that “miles...Herluinus” fled the battle and afterwards founded “in patrimonio suo in loco...Beccus...cœnobium sanctæ Dei genitricis Mariæ”[2233].  Le Prévost dates this event to “antérieure à 1034, époque présumée de la fondation du Bec”[2234].  He was appointed guardian of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after the death in 1040 of Alain III Duke of Brittany[2235].  He was murdered by his cousin Raoul de Waco, after which Brionne was kept by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2236].  On the other hand, another passage in Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Witot” had been exiled “propter occisionem Gisleberti comitis”[2237].  Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[2238].  Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi”[2239].  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis", undated but listed among other deaths recorded in Mar[2240].  m ---.  The name of Gilbert's wife is not known.  Gilbert & his wife had four children:
a)         RICHARD de Brionne (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire).  Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[2241].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2242].  He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2243].  Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2244].  Lord of Clare and Tonbridge.  Regent of England 1075.  
-        UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY.
b)         GUILLAUME de Brionne (-after 29 Aug 1060).  "Milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 29 Aug 1060, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2245].
c)         BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richardum et Balduinum” as the two sons of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2246].  He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2247].  Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2248].  Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2249].  Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England built a castle within the walls of Exeter, after he suppressed the town´s rebellion, and appointed “Balduinum de Molis filium Gisleberti comitis” as custodian, dated to early 1067[2250].  After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon.  “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[2251].  Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086.  The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[2252].  m ALBERADE, daughter of ---.  Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[2253].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2254].  Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained.  Baudouin & his wife had six children:
i)          ROBERT (-after Dec 1101).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2255].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2256].  Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy.  The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont[2257].  He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096.  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2258].
ii)         WILLIAM (-1096).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2259].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2260].  He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.
iii)        RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Forde Abbey).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2261].  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2262].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2263].  He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton.  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless[2264].  "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2265].
iv)       ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Forde Abbey, Devon).  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2266].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2267].  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford”[2268].  m ---.  One child:
(a)       ALICE .  The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ”[2269].  m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---.
v)        EMMA .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2270].  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m HUGH de Waft, son of ---.
vi)       daughter .  Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2271].
Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:
vii)       WIGER (-[1133]).  Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”, adding that Wiger became a monk at Bec where he lived for about 40 years under abbots Guillaume and Boson[2272].
d)         ADELA ).  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2273].  m NEEL Vicomte [de Cotentin], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-Aug 1092).
2.         [--- .]  m ---.  One child:
a)         daughter .  Orderic Vitalis records that "Gislebertus comes Brionnæ nepos Ricardi ducis Normannorum" married "neptem suam" to “Baldrico Teutonico”, who had come “cum Wigerio fratre suo in Normanniam” to serve “Ricardo duci” [presumably Duke Richard II][2274].  Her exact parentage is not known.  m BALDRIC, son of --- (-before 1053).

Richard FitzGilbert De Clare and Alice Amice De Meschines

Richard FitzGilbert De Clare and Alice Amice De Meschines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare
Born Clare, Suffolk, England
Died 15 April 1136
Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
Resting place Tonbridge Priory
Title Lord of Clare
Tenure c. 1114/17 – 1136
Other titles Lord of Tonbridge
Lord of Cardigan
Predecessor Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare
Successor Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Hertford
Spouse(s) Alice de Gernon
Parents Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare
Adeliza de Claremont
Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare (died 15 April 1136) Lord of Clare, was an Anglo-Norman nobleman. A marcher lord in Wales, he was also the founder of Tonbridge Priory in Kent.

Contents  [hide]
1 Life
2 Aftermath
3 Family
4 References
5 Sources
Life[edit]
Richard was the eldest son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Adeliza de Claremont.[1] At his father's death he inherited his lands in England and Wales. He is commonly said to have been created Earl of Hertford by either Henry I or Stephen, but no contemporary reference to him, including the record of his death, calls him by any title, while a cartulary states that a tenant had held "de Gilleberto, filio Richardi, et de Ricardo, filio ejus, et postea, de Comite Gilleberto, filio Richardi" ("of Gilbert Fitz Richard, and his son Richard, and then of Earl Gilbert Fitz Richard"), again failing to call Richard 'Earl' while giving that title to his son. Thus his supposed creation as earl is without merit, although his status and wealth made him a great magnate in England.[1]

Directly following the death of Henry I hostilities increased significantly in Wales and a rebellion broke out.[2] Robert was a strong supporter of King Stephen and in the first two years of his reign Robert attested a total of twenty-nine of that king's charters[3] He was with king Stephen when he formalized a treaty with king David I of Scotland and was a royal steward at Stephen's great Easter court in 1136.[3] He was also with Stephen at the siege of Exeter that summer and was in attendance on the king on his return from Normandy. At this point Richard apparently demanded more land in Wales which Stephen was not willing to give him.[3] In 1136 Richard had been away from his lordship in the early part of the year. He returned to the borders of Wales via Hereford in the company of Brian Fitz Count, but on their separating, Richard ignored warnings of the danger and pressed on toward Ceredigion with only a small force.[4] He had not gone far when on 15 April he was ambushed and killed by the men of Gwent under Iorwerth ab Owain and his brother Morgan, grandsons of Caradog ap Gruffydd, in a woody tract called "the ill-way of Coed Grano", near Llanthony Abbey, north of Abergavenny.[5] Today the spot is marked by the 'garreg dial' (the stone of revenge).[6] He was buried in Tonbridge Priory,[7] which he founded.[1]

Aftermath[edit]
The news of Richard's death induced Owain Gwynedd, son of Gruffudd ap Cynan, king of Gwynedd to invade his Lordship. In alliance with Gruffydd ap Rhys of Deheubarth, he won a crushing victory over the Normans at the Battle of Crug Mawr, just outside Cardigan. The town of Cardigan was taken and burnt, and Richard's widow, Adelize, took refuge in Cardigan Castle, which was successfully defended by Robert fitz Martin. She was rescued by Miles of Gloucester who led an expedition to bring her to safety in England.[1]

Family[edit]
Richard married Adeliz, sister of Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester,[1] by her having:

Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare, d. 1153 (without issue), 1st Earl of Hertford.[8]
Roger de Clare, d. 1173, 2nd Earl of Hertford.[8]
Alice de Clare (Adelize de Tonbridge), m. (1) about 1133, Sir William de Percy, Lord of Topcliffe, son of Alan de Percy and Emma de Gant; (2) Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd, brother of Owain Gwynedd
Robert Fitz Richard de Clare, perhaps died in childhood
Rohese de Clare, m. Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln.[9]
Portal icon Normandy portal
References[edit]
^ Jump up to: a b c d e George Cokayne,The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol. III, Ed. Vicary Gibbs (London: St Catherine Press, 1913), p. 243
Jump up ^ David Walker, Medieval Wales (Cambridge UK & New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), p. 45
^ Jump up to: a b c Jennifer C. Ward, 'Royal Service and Reward: The Clare Family and the Crown, 1066-1154', Anglo-Norman Studies XI. Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1988, Ed. R. Allen Brown (Woodbridge, The Boydell Press, 1989), p. 274
Jump up ^ John Horace Round, Studies in Peerage and Family History (Archibald Constable and Co., Ltd., 1901), p. 211
Jump up ^ The historical works of Giraldus Cambrensis, Ed. Thomas Wright (London: H.G. Bohn, 1863), p. 365
Jump up ^ Anna Tucker, Gwent (Princes Risborough: Shire, 1987), p. 40
Jump up ^ James Foster Wadmore, The priory of s. Mary Magdalene at Tonbridge (London: Michell & Hughes, 1881), p. 8
^ Jump up to: a b George Cokayne,The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol. III, Ed. Vicary Gibbs (London: St Catherine Press, 1913), p. 244
Jump up ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its Members from the Earliest Times, Vol. VI, Eds. H. A. Doubleday & Howard de Walden (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1926), p. 645
Amice was the sister of  Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester, and daughter of Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester and Lucy of Bolingbroke.

Roger De Clare and Matilda Maud De St. Hilary

This book has the lineage as I do, pretty much.
The Manors of Suffolk: The hundreds of Babergh and Blackbourn
Walter Arthur Copinger, Harold Bernard Copinger
T.F. Unwin, 1905

"In parcelling out the lands he had acquired, the Conqueror allotted the Manor of Sudbury with 94 manors besides in Suffolk to Richard Fitz Gilbert or de Clare afterwards Earl of Gloucesester and Hertford. It formed portion of the great Honor of Clare and was held of the Crown as part of the Duchy of Lancaster. Richard FitzGilbert was joined with William de Warren in the important office of Justiciary of England in 1073. He fixed his residence shortly before the Domesday Survey at Tunbridge in Kent and in the Survey is called " Ricardu de Tonebruge." He married Rohesia daughter of Walter Giffard 1st Earl of Buckingham and is said to have fallen in a skirmish with the Welsh, when the manor passed to his son Gilbert de Tonebruge. He joined in the rebellion of Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland, but it is narrated that observing that his sovereing Wm. Rufus was about to fall into an ambush, he relented, warned the King, saved him, and was pardoned. He married Adeliza daughter of the Earl of Claremont, and was succeeded by his eldest son Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. He distinguished himself in the wars of Wales, and vastly increased his family possessions in those parts. He took to wife Alice sister of Ranulph de Gernon, 2nd Earl of Chester, and the manor passed on his being killed in Wales the 15 April 1136 to his son Gilbert De Clare 2nd Earl of Hertford . Gilbert is called "Earl of Clare in 1136. This nobleman was a hostage for his uncle the Earl of Chester. In 1145 joining the rebellion in the time of Stephen he was taken prisoner, and confined until he had consented to relinquish his many strongholds. He died in 1152 without issue, and was succeeded by his brother Roger de Clare 3rd Earl of Hertford. In the time of Hen. II this Roger was summoned by Thomas a Becket, the celebrated Archbp. of Canterbury to do homage to his Grace for the Castle of Toneburge, but at the command of the King he refused, alleging that "holding it by military service, it belonged rather to the Crown than to the Church." The Castle had been exchanged by Roger's great grandfather Richard, with the Archbp. of Canterbury, for the Castle of Brion. Roger de Clare was commander of the royal army against the Welsh in 1157, and married 1st a daur. of Payne, Sheriff co. Salop, and 2ndly Maud daughter of James de St. Hilary. On his death in 1173, the manor pased to his son Richard de Clare 4th Earl of Hertford, who married Amicia 2nd daughter and coheir of Wm. FitzRobert, Earl of Gloucester.
It would seem that Sudbury, at least the town, was settled on this marriage, which was subsequently dissolved; for in the Abbreviation of Pleas I John we see a trial as to whether "Amice" formerly wife of Earl Richard De Clare, unjustly disseised Richard son of Wm. de Sudbury of a free tenement there; and the defence of the Countess was that after the  dissolution of her marriage with the Earl of Clare to whom the town of Sudbury was given as her marriage portion, she came to Sudbury, and summoned the said Richard to her Court.' It is a question wheterh the manor had not passed earlier out of the Clare family and became vested in the Earls of Gloucester, and only came back to the Clare family on this marriage; in fact one is inclined to adopt this view, having regard to the entry in 1202, also in the Pleadings in the time of John, that the Countess held her Court at Sudbury, with reference to Richard son of Uluric, and Richard, son of John as to lands there, and to a claim in 1206 by the Countess of Clare to the advowson of St. Gregory, Sudbury, against the Prioress of Eton who asserted that the same had been granted by William formerly Earl of Gloucester father of the said Countess to the nuns of the Church of Eton.
The manor passed in 1217 to Gilbert De Clare 5th Earl of Hertford, created Earl of Gloucester. He was one of the principal barons who contended against King John and one of the 25 barons to enforce the provisions of the Great Charter. He married Isabel 3rd daughter and eventual coheir of Wm. Marshall, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and dying the 25 Oct. 1230 was succeeded by his son Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford and 2nd Earl of Gloucester, who being a minor was placed in wardship to Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent and Justiciary of England, whose daughter to the displeasure of the King, Richard de Clare clandestinely married. It is probable the marriage was dissolved, as immediately after this he was married to Maude, daughter of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, who for the sake of the valuable alliance paid to the crown 5,000 marks and remitted a debt of 2,000 more.

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who Came to America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Other Historical Individuals
Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Kaleen E. Beall
Genealogical Publishing Com, 2004William D'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Sussex, d. 24 Dec. 1193, Crusader; m. Maud de St. Hilary, d. 1173, wid. of Roger De Clare, Earl of Hertford, dau. and h. of James de St. Hilary (Hilaire) du Harcourt, d. abt. 1154, of Field Dalling, Norfolk, by his wife, Aveline.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sir Roger de Clare
2nd Earl of Hertford
CoA Gilbert de Clare.svg
Clare coat of Arms
Reign 1153–1173
Predecessor Gilbert de Clare
Successor Richard de Clare
Born 1116
Tonbridge, Kent, England
Died 1173
Oxfordshire, England
Roger de Clare (1116–1173) was Earl of Hertford from 1153 until his death.

Contents  [hide]
1 Life
2 Family
3 See also
4 Notes
5 References
Life[edit]
Roger was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon.[1] He succeeded to the earldom when his brother Gilbert died without issue.[2]

In 1153, he appears with his cousin, Richard Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, as one of the signatories to the Treaty of Wallingford, in which Stephen recognises Prince Henry as his successor. He is found signing charters at Canterbury and Dover in 1156. Next year, according to Powell, he received from Henry II a grant of whatever lands he could conquer in South Wales. This is probably only an expansion of the statement of the Welsh chronicles that in this year (about 1 June) he entered Cardigan and 'stored' the castles of Humfrey, Aberdovey, Dineir, and Rhystud. Rhys ap Gruffydd, the prince of South Wales, appears to have complained to Henry II of these encroachments ; but being unable to obtain redress from the king of England sent his nephew Einion ab Anarawd to attack Humfirey and the other Norman fortresses. The 'Annales Cambriæ seem to assign these events to the year 1159 ; and the 'Brut' adds that Prince Rhys burnt all the French castles in Cardigan.[2]

In 1158 or 1160, Clare advanced with an army to the relief of Carmarthen Castle, then besieged by Rhys, and pitched his camp at Dinweilir. Not daring to attack the Welsh prince, the English army offered peace and retired home. In 1163, Rhys again invaded the conquests of Clare, who, we learn incidentally, has at some earlier period caused Einion, the capturer of Humfrey Castle, to be murdered by domestic treachery.[2] In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon. From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford".[a] He was the founder of Little Marcis Nunnery prior to 1163.[3]

A second time all Cardigan was wrested from the Norman hands ; and things now wore so threatening an aspect that Henry II led an army into Wales in 1165, although, according to one Welsh account, Rhys had made his peace with the king in 1164, and had even visited him in England. The causes assigned by the Welsh chronicle for this fresh outbreak of hostility are that Henry failed to keep his promises — presumably of restitution — and secondly that Roger, earl of Clare, was honourably receiving Walter, the murderer of Rhys's nephew Einion. For the third time we now read that Cardigan was overrun and the Norman castles burnt; but it is possible that the events assigned by the 'Annales Cambræ' to the year 1165 are the same as those assigned by the 'Brut y Tywysogion' to 1163.[2]

In the intervening years, Clare had been abroad, and is found signing charters at Le Mans, probably about Christmas 1160, and again at Rouen in 1161 (Eyton, pp. 52, 53). In July 1163 he was summoned by Becket to do homage in his capacity of steward to the archbishops of Canterbury for the castle of Tunbridge. In his refusal, which he based on the grounds that he held the castle of the king and not of the archbishop, he was supported by Henry II (Ralph de Diceto, i. 311; Gervase of Canterbury, i. 174, ii. 391). Next year he was one of the ‘recognisers’ of the constitutions of Clarendon (Select Charters, p. 138). Early in 1170 he was appointed one of a band of commissioners for Kent, Surrey, and other arts of southern England (Gerv. Cant. i. 216). His last known signature seems to belong to June or July 1171, and is dated abroad from Chevaillée.[2]

He appears to have died in 1173, and certainly before July or August 1174, when we find Richard, earl of Clare, his son, coming to the king at Northampton.[2]

Family[edit]
Roger married Maud de St. Hilary, daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline.[4] Together they had seven children:

Mabel de Clare, d. 1204, m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
Richard de Clare, b. c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England, d. 28 November 1217, 3rd Earl of Hertford
James de Clare
Eveline (Aveline) de Clare, d. 4 June 1225, m. [1] (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex.[5] m. [2] Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
Roger de Clare, d. 1241, Middleton, Norfolk, England.
John de Clare
Henry de Clare
See also[edit]
Portal icon Normandy portal
Einion ab Anarawd - ordered to be murdered.
Notes[edit]
Jump up ^ There is a first school, Roger de Clare School, in the village of Puckeridge, Hertfordshire, named after Roger de Clare.
References[edit]
Jump up ^ George Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol. III, Ed. Vicary Gibbs (London: St Catherine Press, 1913), p. 244
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Archer 1887.
Jump up ^ William Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum Vol. 6, Part III (London: 1849), p. 1698
Jump up ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol I, Ed. Vicary Gibbs (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1910). p. 236
Jump up ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol V, Eds. H. A. Doubleday & Howard de Walden (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1926), p. 124

Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Amice FitzWilliam(FitzRobert)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir Richard de Clare
3rd Earl of Hertford
CoA Gilbert de Clare.svg
Clare Coat of Arms
Reign1173–1217
PredecessorRoger de Clare
SuccessorGilbert de Clare
Bornc. 1153
Tonbridge CastleTonbridge,Kent, England
Died1217
Oxfordshire, England
Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, 4th Earl of Gloucester jure uxoris (c. 1153–1217), Anglo-Norman nobleman and Welsh baron.

Career[edit]

Richard was the son of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and Maud, daughter of James de St. Hillary.[1] More commonly known as the Earl of Clare, he had the majority of the Giffard estates from his ancestor, Rohese.[2] He was present at the coronations of King Richard I at Westminster, 3 September 1189, and King John on 27 May 1199. He was also present at the homage of King William of Scotland as English Earl of Huntingdon at Lincoln.[citation needed]

Marriage[edit]

He married (c. 1172) Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160–1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, and Hawise de Beaumont. Sometime before 1198, Earl Richard and his wife Amice were ordered to separate by the Pope on grounds of consanguinity. They separated for a time because of this order but apparently reconciled their marriage with the Pope later on.[citation needed]

Magna Carta[edit]

He sided with the Barons against King John, even though he had previously sworn peace with the King at Northampton, and his castle of Tonbridge was taken. He played a leading part in the negotiations for Magna Carta, being one of the twenty five sureties. On 9 November 1215, he was one of the commissioners on the part of the Barons to negotiate the peace with the King. In 1215, his lands in counties CambridgeNorfolk,Suffolk and Essex were granted to Robert de Betun. He and his son were among the Barons excommunicated by the Pope in 1215. His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.[citation needed]

Family[edit]

Richard and Amice had children:
Gilbert de Clare (ca. 1180 – 25 October 1230), 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester, (or 1st Earl of Gloucester of new creation). Married in 1217 Isabel Marshal.
Maud (Matilda) de Clare (ca. 1184–1213), married in 1206, Sir William de Braose, son of William de Braose and Maud de St. Valery.
Richard de Clare (ca. 1184 – 4 Mar 1228, London[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, eds. H. A. Doubleday; Howard de Walden, Vol. V (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1926), p. 736
  2. Jump up^ I. J. Sanders, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327) (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 34, 62


 
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