Sunday, September 29, 2013

George Bohun and Catherine Morgan

George Bohun was born in 1610 in Devon, England, United Kingdom as the first child of George Boone and Ann Fallace. He died in 1676 in Devon, England, United Kingdom.

George Bohun and Catherine Morgan had the following children:

1. George Boone was born on 17 Nov 1646 in Exeter, Berks Co., Pennsylvania, USA. He died in May 1696 in Devonshire, England. He married Sarah Uppey in 1665 in , Devon, , England.




  *The Boone family dates back to the time of the Norman Conquests in the tenth century and the name is likely of Norman origin. The Boones of NC, TN & KY are of Scotch-Irish descent. The name "Boon" is thought to be anglicized from the French word bon, meaning "good" or is a place name meaning one from Bohun in the Northwest corner of France. Normative American research, based on the authority of Boone researchers such as Sarah Rockenfield (Our Boone Families), Hazel Spaker and a brief list of his known ancestors written down in 1788 by Squire Boone’s brother, James, identifies George Boone II and his putative father, George Boone I of Exeter, as the earliest known verified ancestors in the Boone line (according to some, no dates or wife are known or verifiable for George Boone I). However there are statements made by several early Boones that the family is thought to be of royal descent, possibly from a family and/or place in Normandy called (De) Bohun. Though controversial and not definitely proven, there is other English research, done by genealogist Vivienne George and recorded in the Sierra Boone Echoes which connects the Boone line with the (De) Bohun lineage, claiming to take the line back as far as the early medieval Norse/Norman ancestor, Sveide the Viking (ca.760 AD). Vivienne says she located, quite by accident, an obscure book in Canterbury, England, written in 1515, that records the line from Sir Humphrey of de Bohun (1418-1468), who married Margaret Estfield, daughter of the Mayor of London, back to Ralph de Bohun (b. ca 1208). From obscure, hard-to-read Welsh records, she was able to connect and bring the line forward from Sir Humphrey to George Boone III (1666-1744), who married Mary Maugridge. (Dr. R.N. Mayfield, connected directly with the family of Daniel Boone, claims great antiquity for the Boone line and asserts that it may be traced back to the fourteenth century, or even beyond, when the Bohuns of Norman origin, settled in Lincolnshire, and afterwards in Devonshire, England. Also, A History and a Genealogy, by Rev. J. W. Early, Reading, Pa. tells us, that in the sixteenth century, both spellings, Bohun and Boone, are found in the same documents.     The family appears to date back to a Norman-English family of nobility called de Bohun, probably originating from a French settlement of that name. This family arrived in England along with William the Conqueror, having probably fought alongside him at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The earliest record of a de Bohun can be found in the Norfolk section of the Domesday book, where a Humphrey de Bohun was recorded as owning land. Over the next three centuries they grew to become one of the most powerful English dynasties of the middle ages. The de Bohun family appears to have gathered power during the mid 12th century. Throughout the 13th and 14th centuries, various members of the family claimed Earldoms of many English counties including Herefordshire, Northamptonshire and Essex, plus minor seats in Midhurst and Brecon. The most powerful dynasty of all lasted 174 years from 1200 until 1373. They were known as the Earls of Hereford, Constables of all England and were heavily involved in the 'Braveheart' story. At Falkirk, Robert de Bruce apparently fought and killed a Humphrey de Bohun tangential to our immediate line. At one time, the Earl of Hereford was possibly the third most powerful man in England, carrying the banners of 17 knights to the Siege of Caerlaverock in July 1300, this compared to King Edward's 33 and 23 for the King's son. The de Bohuns' coat of arms was an azure blue shield with a thick diagonal white or silver band and six rampant gold lions, three in each half of the blue. The Bohun line, through various marriages, connects to Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, a line of Scottish kings and tentatively, back to Persia’s Cyrus the Great and Ramses II of Egypt.     The name de Bohun would probably have been pronounced with a silent 'h' as the family had Norman-French origins and the French would not sound it. In fact, most 13th and 14th century documents that contain information about the family omit the letter 'h' altogether. The Matthew Paris shields roll I c.~1240 lists one Henricus de Boun, comes Herefordie, the St. George's roll c.1285 lists one Fraunc d'Boun. Most interesting of all, a copy of Thevet's version of the Falkirk roll c.1298, held at the British Museum, lists as second in command of the English at the Battle of Falkirk, one Humfray de Bown, Counte de Hereford, Constable de Engleterre. This final spelling of the surname would suggest that Bohun may actually have been pronounced Bown. Boon could be the Scottish and medieval northern English pronunciation, i.e. brown being pronounced broone.
 *The Boone family dates back to the time of the Norman Conquests in the tenth century and the name is likely of Norman origin. The Boones of NC, TN & KY are of Scotch-Irish descent. The name "Boon" is thought to be anglicized from the French word bon, meaning "good" or is a place name meaning one from Bohun in the Northwest corner of France. Normative American research, based on the authority of Boone researchers such as Sarah Rockenfield (Our Boone Families), Hazel Spaker and a brief list of his known ancestors written down in 1788 by Squire Boone’s brother, James, identifies George Boone II and his putative father, George Boone I of Exeter, as the earliest known verified ancestors in the Boone line (according to some, no dates or wife are known or verifiable for George Boone I). However there are statements made by several early Boones that the family is thought to be of royal descent, possibly from a family and/or place in Normandy called (De) Bohun. Though controversial and not definitely proven, there is other English research, done by genealogist Vivienne George and recorded in the Sierra Boone Echoes which connects the Boone line with the (De) Bohun lineage, claiming to take the line back as far as the early medieval Norse/Norman ancestor, Sveide the Viking (ca.760 AD). Vivienne says she located, quite by accident, an obscure book in Canterbury, England, written in 1515, that records the line from Sir Humphrey of de Bohun (1418-1468), who married Margaret Estfield, daughter of the Mayor of London, back to Ralph de Bohun (b. ca 1208). From obscure, hard-to-read Welsh records, she was able to connect and bring the line forward from Sir Humphrey to George Boone III (1666-1744), who married Mary Maugridge. (Dr. R.N. Mayfield, connected directly with the family of Daniel Boone, claims great antiquity for the Boone line and asserts that it may be traced back to the fourteenth century, or even beyond, when the Bohuns of Norman origin, settled in Lincolnshire, and afterwards in Devonshire, England. Also, A History and a Genealogy, by Rev. J. W. Early, Reading, Pa. tells us, that in the sixteenth century, both spellings, Bohun and Boone, are found in the same documents.

 The family appears to date back to a Norman-English family of nobility called de Bohun, probably originating from a French settlement of that name. This family arrived in England along with William the Conqueror, having probably fought alongside him at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The earliest record of a de Bohun can be found in the Norfolk section of the Domesday book, where a Humphrey de Bohun was recorded as owning land. Over the next three centuries they grew to become one of the most powerful English dynasties of the middle ages. The de Bohun family appears to have gathered power during the mid 12th century. Throughout the 13th and 14th centuries, various members of the family claimed Earldoms of many English counties including Herefordshire, Northamptonshire and Essex, plus minor seats in Midhurst and Brecon. The most powerful dynasty of all lasted 174 years from 1200 until 1373. They were known as the Earls of Hereford, Constables of all England and were heavily involved in the 'Braveheart' story. At Falkirk, Robert de Bruce apparently fought and killed a Humphrey de Bohun tangential to our immediate line. At one time, the Earl of Hereford was possibly the third most powerful man in England, carrying the banners of 17 knights to the Siege of Caerlaverock in July 1300, this compared to King Edward's 33 and 23 for the King's son. The de Bohuns' coat of arms was an azure blue shield with a thick diagonal white or silver band and six rampant gold lions, three in each half of the blue. The Bohun line, through various marriages, connects to Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, a line of Scottish kings and tentatively, back to Persia’s Cyrus the Great and Ramses II of Egypt.

 The name de Bohun would probably have been pronounced with a silent 'h' as the family had Norman-French origins and the French would not sound it. In fact, most 13th and 14th century documents that contain information about the family omit the letter 'h' altogether. The Matthew Paris shields roll I c.~1240 lists one Henricus de Boun, comes Herefordie, the St. George's roll c.1285 lists one Fraunc d'Boun. Most interesting of all, a copy of Thevet's version of the Falkirk roll c.1298, held at the British Museum, lists as second in command of the English at the Battle of Falkirk, one Humfray de Bown, Counte de Hereford, Constable de Engleterre. This final spelling of the surname would suggest that Bohun may actually have been pronounced Bown. Boon could be the Scottish and medieval northern English pronunciation, i.e. brown being pronounced broone.

http://wgscroggins.kueber.us/Bohun,%20Boon,%20Boone.pdf




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