Sunday, December 14, 2014

Glumra 'eystein The Noisy' Ivarsson

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Eystein Glumra (the Clatterer), also called Eystein Ivarsson (born ca. 805 in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway) was Jarl (Earl) of Oppland and Hedmark in Norway.[1][2]

The Heimskringla Saga states that Eystein Glumra was the father of Rognvald Eysteinsson and Sigurd Eysteinsson. And, that he was grandfather of Guthorm Sigurdsson and Torf-Einarr. Although the Saga does mention a few Ivars, none are said to be Eystein's father.[3]

The first earl in the Orkney Islands was called Sigurd, who was a son of Eystein Glumra, and brother of Ragnvald earl of More. After Sigurd, his son Guthorm was earl for one year. After him Torf-Einar, a son of Ragnvald, took the earldom, and was long earl, and was a man of great power.
According to the Orkneyinga Saga, Eystein the noisy was the son of Ivar the Uplanders’ earl, and grandson of Halfdan the Old. He was also father of Rognvald The Wise.[4]

Heiti, Gorr’s son, was father of Sveiði the sea-king, the father of Halfdan the old, the father of Ivar the Uplanders’ earl, the father of Eystein the noisy, the father of earl Rognvald the mighty and the wise in council.
Orkneyinga Saga makes his grandson Hrolf identical to Rollo, conqueror of Normandy, and hence ancestor of William the Conqueror and the resulting Royal Families of England, although the connection is viewed skeptically by scholars.

References[edit]
Jump up ^ Norsk Biografisk Leksikon, (19 volumes. Oslo: Aschehoug, 1921-1982), FHL book 948.1 D36n., vol. 11 p. 272-273.
Jump up ^ Våre Forfedre, Bugge, Mogens Fraas, (Olso: I kommisjon hos Cammermeyers Boghandel, 1939), FHL book 929.2481 B865b., p. 34.
Jump up ^ Heimskringla - SAGA OF OLAF HARALDSON
Jump up ^ THE ORKNEYINGERS’ SAGA

My Sources:
Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Volume 1; 1898 - Staffordshire (England)

The Heimskringla: Or, The Sagas of the Norse Kings from the Icelandic of Snorre Sturlason, Volume 4
Snorri Sturluson, Samuel Laing, Rasmus Björn Anderson
J. C. Nimmo, 1889 – America

Following the Ark of the Covenant: The Treasure of God
Kerry Ross Boren, Lisa Lee Boren
Cedar Fort, Sep 1, 2000

Icelandic Sagas and Other Historical Documents Relating to the Settlements and Descents of the Northmen of the British Isles
Cambridge University Press, Nov 15, 2012

“Gorr had the isles, and for that he was called a sea-king; his sons were they Heiti and Beiti, they were sea-kings and mighty overbearing men. They had made many inroads on the realm of Norr's sons, and they had many battles and now one, now the other won the day. Beiti ran into Drontheim and warred there; he lay where it is now called Beitsea and Beitstede; thence he made them drag his ship from the innermost bight of Beitstede, and so north over Elduneck, that is where the Naumdales come down from the north. He sat himself on the poop and held the tiller in his hand, and claimed for his own all that land that then lay on the larboard, and that is many tilths and much land. Heiti, Gorr's son, was father of Sveidi, the sea-king, the father of Halfdan the old, the father of Ivar the Uplander's earl, the father of Eystein the noisy, the father of earl Rognvald the mighty and the wise in council.

Earl Rognvald joined Harold fair-hair when he seized the land, but he (Harold) gave him lordship over both the Maeren and Romsdale; he had to wife Ragnhilda the daughter of Hrolf nosy; their son was Hrolf who won Normandy, he was so tall that horses could not carry him; for that he was called Ganging-Hrolf; from him are come the Rouen Jarls and the English Kings; their son was also Ivar, and Thorir the silent. Rognvald had also base-born sons, their names were Hallad and Hrollaug and Einar, he was the youngest. Harold fair-hair fared the summer west across the sea to chastise the Vikings, when he was weary at the peacelessness of those who harried in Norway in summer, but were in the winter in Shetland or the Orkneys. He laid under him Shetland and the Orkneys and the Southern Isles; he fared west too as far as Man, and laid waste the tilths of Man. He had there many battles, and took as his own lands so far west that no king of Norway has ever owned land further west since. And in one battle, Ivar, son of earl Rognvald, fell. But when king Harold sailed from the west, then he gave to earl Rognvald, as an atonement for his son, Shetland and the Orkneys; but earl Rognvald gave both lands to Sigurd and his brother: he was one of king Harold's forecastle men. The king gave Sigurd the title of earl when he went from the west, and Sigurd stayed behing there in the west.”

The British Chronicles, Volume 2
David Hughes
Heritage Books, Jan 1, 2007

Chronicles of the Vikings: Records, Memorials, and Myths
Raymond Ian Page
University of Toronto Press, 1995

[WmtheConqueror.GED] [mccoydick.FTW] !NOTE: Royal & Noble Genealogical Data On the

Glumra, Eystein the Noisy, Jarl of the Uplanders Born: 788 Father: , Ivar of the Uplands, Earl of the Uplands Married to Ragnvaldsdottir, Ascrida Child 1: Eysteinsson, Ragnvald I the wise of More Child 2: Eysteinsson, Sigurd I Riki the Powerful, Earl of Orkney Child 3: Eysteinsdottir, Swanhilda Jarl is a Scandinavian title meaning a nobleman ranking directly below the King. I have seen the title in connection with Norsemen or Vikings.
[WmtheConqueror.GED]
[mccoydick.FTW]
!NOTE: Royal & Noble Genealogical Data On the
Glumra, Eystein the Noisy, Jarl of the Uplanders
Born: 788
Father: , Ivar of the Uplands, Earl of the Uplands
Married to Ragnvaldsdottir, Ascrida
Child 1: Eysteinsson, Ragnvald I the wise of More
Child 2: Eysteinsson, Sigurd I Riki the Powerful, Earl of Orkney
Child 3: Eysteinsdottir, Swanhilda
Jarl is a Scandinavian title meaning a nobleman ranking directly below the King.
I have seen the title in connection with Norsemen or Vikings.
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