Saturday, October 12, 2013

Thomas Lilly Lilley and Philippa Marshall


Thomas Lilly Lilley was born in 1533 in Stoke Prior, Worcester, England as the second child of Thomas Bromsgrove Lilly and Elizabeth Owen. He had two siblings, namely: Richard, and John. He died in St. Botolph's, Aldergate, London, England. When he was 27, He married Philippa Marshall,daughter of Thomas Marshall, about 1560 in Stoke Prior, Worcestershire, England. When he was 34, He married Joyce Jane Hemmings in 1567 in Worcester, England.

Thomas Lilly Lilley was buried in St. Batalph's Aldergate, London, England. He was buried in St. Bataph's Aldergate London, England.

Thomas Lilly Lilley and Joyce Jane Hemmings had the following children:

1. Edward.

Thomas Lilly Lilley and Philippa Marshall had the following children:

1. Thomas Lyly Lilly was born in 1559 in Stoke Prior, Worcester, England. He married Elizabeth Tour about 1584 in Truro, Cornwall, England.

2. Margaret Lyly Lilly was born about 1565 in Stoke Prior, Worcester, England.

3. John Lyly Lilly was born about 1561 in London, Middlesex, England or Wilkin, Coventry, Warwick, England. He died on 27 Nov 1590. He married Mary Gabots Gabbett on 22 Sep 1583 in Saint Dunstan In the East, London, England.

4. George Lyly Lilly was born in 1563 in Wikin, Warwickshire, England.

5. Richard Lyly Lilly was born in 1557 in Stoke Prior, Worcester, England.


  [Lilly2.FTW] [LillyGreyBowe.ftw] IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0  British Isles  AFN:ZF0P-SW BROMSGROVE or BROOMSGROVE, anciently Bremesgrave, a market town in Worcestershire, situated near the small river Salwarp, and on the direct road from Birmingham to Bristol, 13 miles from Birmingham, 13 N.N.E. from Worcester, and 118 N.W. from London. The town consists principally of one good street, a mile in length, paved, and lighted by gas. It contains one church, and three dissenting places of worship, a market-house, a grammar-school, and a court for the recovery of small debts. The market is on Tuesday, and, together with two annual fairs, held on the 24th of June and on the 1st of October, was granted to the inhabitants by King John. The population of the parish of Bromsgrove amounted, according to the last census, to 8,612 ; that of the town is about 5,000. It was formerly governed by a corporation, but there are now neither recorder nor aldermen, and the only office of the bailiff is that of collecting the dues belonging to the lord of the manor. This place was also formerly, a borough, and in the reign of Edward I returned two members to parliament ; but when the trade of the town declined, the inhabitants were, on their own petition, freed from that ‘burden:’ it is now comprised in the E. division of the county. The church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is situated on a gentle eminence ; its tower and spire, together 189 feet in height, are perhaps the most beautiful in the county. There was a church at Bromsgrove at the time of the Conquest. The patronage of the rectory was vested in the crown till the reign of Henry III, by whom it was conferred on the prior of Worcester ; the bishop of the diocese confirmed the king’s gift, and instituted a vicarage : the dean and chapter are the present patrons. The grammar-school was founded by Edward VI, who endowed it with £7 per annum ; the income was augmented by Sir T. Cookes, who died in 1701, by £50 a year. Twelve boys on the foundation are educated, clothed, and apprenticed : and in Worcester College, Oxford, are six scholarships and six fellowships, the vacancies in which are filled up by boys selected from this school. At Shipley appears the Ikineld Street, which leaving Warwickshire at Beoley, re-enters that county at Edgbaston, near Birmingham. The linen manufacture was formerly carried on to a considerable extent, but has been entirely abandoned. Nail-making is now the principal trade, but there is also an extensive manufactory for patent buttons. At this place the successful cultivation of the apple for cider may be considered as terminating : farther N. the spring frosts rendering the produce uncertain. A singular circumstance occurred at Bromsgrove, a few years since, in four children being born at one birth, all of whom, together with the mother, survived. It is generally but incorrectly asserted in topographical accounts of Bromsgrove, that coal and limestone occur in the parish, and that a singular petrifying spring exists in the neighbourhood. Bromsgrove is situated in a highly-cultivated and richly-wooded valley. On the Lickey Hill, which forms one of its acclivities, are the sources of the river Rea, which flows through Birmingham ; of the Salwarp, which passes through Droitwich ; of the Arrow, and of several small streams, some of which fall into the basin of the Severn and ultimately into the Irish channel, while others descend in the opposite direction to the basin of the Trent and the German Ocean. The strata belong to the new red sandstone formation. The Lickey is composed of quartz, and must at some period have been an immense mountain ; for it is considered by geologists as the source from whence have been derived the vast beds of gravel which extend through Oxfordshire, in the valley of the Evenlode, and even along the Thames. At Hanbury, just without the confines of the parish, Saurian remains are found imbedded in the lias, and at Stoke Prior commences red and green marl, traversed by veins of gypsum. In the parish of Stoke Prior, and closely adjoining that of Bromsgrove, are situated the extensive salt and alkali works carried on by the British Alkali Company. As this establishment furnishes an instance of the rapid introduction of a manufacture into a district which had been previously confined to agriculture, a short notice of its progress may be interesting. The manufacture of salt has been carried on for centuries in the adjoining borough of Droitwich, where it is prepared from rich springs of native brine. The only situations where rock-salt had been met with in this island were in Cheshire, previously to its being discovered at Stoke Prior, where it was obtained in 1829, in the course of sinking a pit in search of brine. The beds of salt were of great thickness, and were excavated to a considerable extent ; but at present the supplies for making refined salt are derived from a natural brine spring, which has communicated with the excavations. Immediately after making this discovery, the proprietors erected extensive works for the manufacture of salt, and for the preparation of British alkali, by the decomposition of this substance, which very speedily changed the green fields and retired lanes into an active manufactory and a lively village. The beneficial effects of this introduction of an extensive manufacture commence with an immediate demand for the surplus labourers, an increased consumption of the necessaries of life, and a contribution towards meeting the parochial expenditure ; the neighbouring agriculturist finds his burdens relieved, at the same time that a market for his productions is brought into his immediate neighbourhood. A dispassionate view of instances such as the present would tend greatly to subdue the feeling of jealousy which exists between the agricultural and manufacturing interests in this kingdom. The benefits derived from the successful establishment of a manufacture is not confined to the labouring population, and to occupiers of land in its vicinity alone, but extends more widely : thus, in the present instance, these works being situated on the banks of the Birmingham and Worcester Canal occasioned, on their being fully established, an increase in the value of that property to the extent of 70 per cent. ; and the influence they are likely to produce in the rising port of Gloucester, by furnishing to it a large supply of salt for exportation, is calculated to be very considerable.  Noake's Worcestershire Page 327 STOKE PRIOR. 327  Stoke Prior.  THIS village, between Bromsgrove and Droitwich, in Saxon times belonged to the Prior of Worcester, and hence the latter portion of its name. The church was appropriated to Worcester monastery, for the use of the chamberlain in providing vestments and shoes for the monks; and from this manor the tenants usually sent two fat cows to be killed for the monastery at the Feast of St. Mary. The Dean and Chapter of Worcester were lords of the manor till recently on its being handed over, with their other possessions, to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. There is a population of 1,622, and an acreage of 3,820, Crops grown, wheat, barley, beans, and mangolds. Besides agricultural employments, salt-making is carried on at the extensive works of J. Corbett, Esq., and the manufacture of railway waggons at the Midland Company's works. The salt-works, which employ about 500 pairs of hands, were commenced here about forty-three years ago. For some years great difficulty was experienced in finding brine, and when found it was not of sufficient strength to render the works profitable. The present proprietor, however, has succeeded not only in rendering the works profitable, but in extending them, so that probably they are now the largest in Europe, having cost upwards of £400,000. Formerly, soap, soda, and various chemicals were manufactured here, in addition to salt, but the present proprietor took down the chemical works, and at the present time nothing but salt is manufactured. This trade fluctuates considerably, according to the demand and the state of competition with the works in Cheshire, and the salt manufactured abroad by solar evaporation. Stoke Works are capable of producing nearly 3,000 tons of salt per week, but the demand is very seldom equal to that. There are four brine pits, the deepest in England. The first two of these cost some £30,000 in their completion. There are formidable streams of water passing through them, and the pits are cased with iron cylinders to keep the water from the brine. Among the excellent arrangements made at these works by the present proprietor was the suppression, in 1859, of the degrading system of female labour - a change which has resulted in benefit to the morals and comfort of the females and their families. This fact is commemorated in a stained glass window in the parish church, as a testimonial to Mr. Corbett. Schools and a clothing club have likewise been founded at the works for the children of the workpeople. Truck making and brick making are also carried on here, and the extensive works at Bromsgrove Station are in this parish. At Ryefields Farm, in this parish, is a reformatory for boys, established by the late Joseph Sturge. The Birmingham and Worcester Canal runs through Stoke, and the Midland and Great Western Railways have each a station here. Stoke Grange and Rigby Hall - the former the residence of J. Corbett, Esq., and the latter of R. Smallwood, Esq. - as also Finstall House, occupied by Mr. Palmer, are the principal mansions in the parish. The church was restored in 1858 and 1865, on the latter occasion chiefly through the liberality of Mr. Corbett, at a cost of about £1,000. It is an interesting specimen of Norman, Transitional, and Early English work, with the tower in an unusual position - the east end of the south aisle. There are some curious monuments here. There is an old room over the vestry of the church which is supposed to have been a domus inclusa, or cell for a recluse, in the middle ages. In the Pipe Rolls of the reigns of Henry II, Richard I, and John, mention is made of a yearly payment by the Vice-Comes of 30s. 5d. out of the royal revenues of this county to the "inclusa de Stoke." Or the cell may have been where is now the chapel of St. Godwald, at Finstall, in this parish. The present chapel was erected in 1773, but there must have been one there from early times, as in an "Ordinatio vicarie de Stoke Prioris," dated 1390, it is stipulated that the vicar should receive the offerings made there. "Item percipiet oblationes factas in capella sancti Godwali." Value of the living, £310; viear. Rev. H. Aldham; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester; church accommodation, 650; free seats, 223.   The Heraldry of Worcestershire: Being a Roll of the Arms Borne by the ... - Page 345 by Henry Sydney Grazebrook - Worcestershire (England) - 1873  LILLY, of Bromsgrove, Stoke Prior, and London.---This family did not appear at any of the Visitations; but it appears, from a pedigree in the Harl. MS., 1566, that -------Lilly, of Bromsgrove, had two sons,-------Lilly, and Thomas Lilly (of whom presently).  The former had issue(with a daughter, Margarett, married to Richard Bradley), three sons:---Gilbert, of London, merchant tailor, who had a daughter, Judith; Reginald, of Bromsgrove, who, by Margaret, his wife, daughter of -----Bradley, of Stourbridge, had Gilbert, of Bromsgrove, Nicholas and William, of Alvechurch, all married, and a daughter, Margaret, wife of Francis Knight; and Thomas, of Worcester, who had three sons, Richard, of Worcester, Edmund, of London, and William.  Thomas Lilly, of Bromsgrove, above named, had issue (with daughters) three sons:---John, who purchased lands in Warwickshire; Richard; and Thomas, of Stoke Prior.  The latter was twice married: first to Philippa, daughter of Thomas Marshall, and secondly, to Jane, daughter and co-heiress of -----Hemming, to Jane, daughter and co-heiress of -----Hemming, of the Vale of Evesham.  By the latter he had issue a son, Edward, of London, who had a son, George; and by the former he had:---Richard, who died s.p.; Thomas, who had a son, Henry; George, of Wilkin, who had a daughter, Sarah; and John, of London, who married Mary, daughter of John Gabbett, and had two sons, John and Henry.  The latter,(Henry), was of London, pursuivant of arms; he married Elizabeth, daughter of ----Flynt of Fisherton,co. Wilts.  Homes of Family Names in Great Britain - Page 405 by Henry Brougham Guppy - Names, Personal British - 1890  There is a Warwickshire parish of the name.....HEMMING or HEMING, a name having its present home in the Evesham district, is an Anglo-Saxon clan name.  It was well known in Worcester in the 17th century, Richard Heming being the name of the mayor of the city in 1627 and 1657, and John Heming in 677 (G.); the name is still in that city. One of the name was buried in Tenbury church in 1691 (N.)  It is also now represented in Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, and Warwickshire, sometimes in the form of Hemmings.  Last century there was a Gloucestershire family of the name in Barrigton Parva (Bigland's "Gloucestershire")
 [Lilly2.FTW]

 [LillyGreyBowe.ftw]

 IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0
 British Isles

 AFN:ZF0P-SW

 BROMSGROVE or BROOMSGROVE, anciently Bremesgrave, a market town in Worcestershire, situated near the small river Salwarp, and on the direct road from Birmingham to Bristol, 13 miles from Birmingham, 13 N.N.E. from Worcester, and 118 N.W. from London. The town consists principally of one good street, a mile in length, paved, and lighted by gas. It contains one church, and three dissenting places of worship, a market-house, a grammar-school, and a court for the recovery of small debts. The market is on Tuesday, and, together with two annual fairs, held on the 24th of June and on the 1st of October, was granted to the inhabitants by King John.

 The population of the parish of Bromsgrove amounted, according to the last census, to 8,612 ; that of the town is about 5,000. It was formerly governed by a corporation, but there are now neither recorder nor aldermen, and the only office of the bailiff is that of collecting the dues belonging to the lord of the manor. This place was also formerly, a borough, and in the reign of Edward I returned two members to parliament ; but when the trade of the town declined, the inhabitants were, on their own petition, freed from that ‘burden:’ it is now comprised in the E. division of the county.

 The church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is situated on a gentle eminence ; its tower and spire, together 189 feet in height, are perhaps the most beautiful in the county. There was a church at Bromsgrove at the time of the Conquest. The patronage of the rectory was vested in the crown till the reign of Henry III, by whom it was conferred on the prior of Worcester ; the bishop of the diocese confirmed the king’s gift, and instituted a vicarage : the dean and chapter are the present patrons. The grammar-school was founded by Edward VI, who endowed it with £7 per annum ; the income was augmented by Sir T. Cookes, who died in 1701, by £50 a year. Twelve boys on the foundation are educated, clothed, and apprenticed : and in Worcester College, Oxford, are six scholarships and six fellowships, the vacancies in which are filled up by boys selected from this school.

 At Shipley appears the Ikineld Street, which leaving Warwickshire at Beoley, re-enters that county at Edgbaston, near Birmingham.

 The linen manufacture was formerly carried on to a considerable extent, but has been entirely abandoned. Nail-making is now the principal trade, but there is also an extensive manufactory for patent buttons. At this place the successful cultivation of the apple for cider may be considered as terminating : farther N. the spring frosts rendering the produce uncertain.

 A singular circumstance occurred at Bromsgrove, a few years since, in four children being born at one birth, all of whom, together with the mother, survived.

 It is generally but incorrectly asserted in topographical accounts of Bromsgrove, that coal and limestone occur in the parish, and that a singular petrifying spring exists in the neighbourhood.

 Bromsgrove is situated in a highly-cultivated and richly-wooded valley. On the Lickey Hill, which forms one of its acclivities, are the sources of the river Rea, which flows through Birmingham ; of the Salwarp, which passes through Droitwich ; of the Arrow, and of several small streams, some of which fall into the basin of the Severn and ultimately into the Irish channel, while others descend in the opposite direction to the basin of the Trent and the German Ocean. The strata belong to the new red sandstone formation. The Lickey is composed of quartz, and must at some period have been an immense mountain ; for it is considered by geologists as the source from whence have been derived the vast beds of gravel which extend through Oxfordshire, in the valley of the Evenlode, and even along the Thames.

 At Hanbury, just without the confines of the parish, Saurian remains are found imbedded in the lias, and at Stoke Prior commences red and green marl, traversed by veins of gypsum.

 In the parish of Stoke Prior, and closely adjoining that of Bromsgrove, are situated the extensive salt and alkali works carried on by the British Alkali Company. As this establishment furnishes an instance of the rapid introduction of a manufacture into a district which had been previously confined to agriculture, a short notice of its progress may be interesting. The manufacture of salt has been carried on for centuries in the adjoining borough of Droitwich, where it is prepared from rich springs of native brine. The only situations where rock-salt had been met with in this island were in Cheshire, previously to its being discovered at Stoke Prior, where it was obtained in 1829, in the course of sinking a pit in search of brine. The beds of salt were of great thickness, and were excavated to a considerable extent ; but at present the supplies for making refined salt are derived from a natural brine spring, which has communicated with the excavations. Immediately after making this discovery, the proprietors erected extensive works for the manufacture of salt, and for the preparation of British alkali, by the decomposition of this substance, which very speedily changed the green fields and retired lanes into an active manufactory and a lively village. The beneficial effects of this introduction of an extensive manufacture commence with an immediate demand for the surplus labourers, an increased consumption of the necessaries of life, and a contribution towards meeting the parochial expenditure ; the neighbouring agriculturist finds his burdens relieved, at the same time that a market for his productions is brought into his immediate neighbourhood. A dispassionate view of instances such as the present would tend greatly to subdue the feeling of jealousy which exists between the agricultural and manufacturing interests in this kingdom. The benefits derived from the successful establishment of a manufacture is not confined to the labouring population, and to occupiers of land in its vicinity alone, but extends more widely : thus, in the present instance, these works being situated on the banks of the Birmingham and Worcester Canal occasioned, on their being fully established, an increase in the value of that property to the extent of 70 per cent. ; and the influence they are likely to produce in the rising port of Gloucester, by furnishing to it a large supply of salt for exportation, is calculated to be very considerable.


 Noake's Worcestershire Page 327
 STOKE PRIOR. 327


 Stoke Prior.


 THIS village, between Bromsgrove and Droitwich, in Saxon times belonged to the Prior of Worcester, and hence the latter portion of its name. The church was appropriated to Worcester monastery, for the use of the chamberlain in providing vestments and shoes for the monks; and from this manor the tenants usually sent two fat cows to be killed for the monastery at the Feast of St. Mary. The Dean and Chapter of Worcester were lords of the manor till recently on its being handed over, with their other possessions, to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. There is a population of 1,622, and an acreage of 3,820, Crops grown, wheat, barley, beans, and mangolds.

 Besides agricultural employments, salt-making is carried on at the extensive works of J. Corbett, Esq., and the manufacture of railway waggons at the Midland Company's works. The salt-works, which employ about 500 pairs of hands, were commenced here about forty-three years ago. For some years great difficulty was experienced in finding brine, and when found it was not of sufficient strength to render the works profitable. The present proprietor, however, has succeeded not only in rendering the works profitable, but in extending them, so that probably they are now the largest in Europe, having cost upwards of £400,000. Formerly, soap, soda, and various chemicals were manufactured here, in addition to salt, but the present proprietor took down the chemical works, and at the present time nothing but salt is manufactured. This trade fluctuates considerably, according to the demand and the state of competition with the works in Cheshire, and the salt manufactured abroad by solar evaporation. Stoke Works are capable of producing nearly 3,000 tons of salt per week, but the demand is very seldom equal to that. There are four brine pits, the deepest in England. The first two of these cost some £30,000 in their completion. There are formidable streams of water passing through them, and the pits are cased with iron cylinders to keep the water from the brine.

 Among the excellent arrangements made at these works by the present proprietor was the suppression, in 1859, of the degrading system of female labour - a change which has resulted in benefit to the morals and comfort of the females and their families. This fact is commemorated in a stained glass window in the parish church, as a testimonial to Mr. Corbett. Schools and a clothing club have likewise been founded at the works for the children of the workpeople.

 Truck making and brick making are also carried on here, and the extensive works at Bromsgrove Station are in this parish. At Ryefields Farm, in this parish, is a reformatory for boys, established by the late Joseph Sturge. The Birmingham and Worcester Canal runs through Stoke, and the Midland and Great Western Railways have each a station here. Stoke Grange and Rigby Hall - the former the residence of J. Corbett, Esq., and the latter of R. Smallwood, Esq. - as also Finstall House, occupied by Mr. Palmer, are the principal mansions in the parish.

 The church was restored in 1858 and 1865, on the latter occasion chiefly through the liberality of Mr. Corbett, at a cost of about £1,000. It is an interesting specimen of Norman, Transitional, and Early English work, with the tower in an unusual position - the east end of the south aisle. There are some curious monuments here. There is an old room over the vestry of the church which is supposed to have been a domus inclusa, or cell for a recluse, in the middle ages. In the Pipe Rolls of the reigns of Henry II, Richard I, and John, mention is made of a yearly payment by the Vice-Comes of 30s. 5d. out of the royal revenues of this county to the "inclusa de Stoke." Or the cell may have been where is now the chapel of St. Godwald, at Finstall, in this parish. The present chapel was erected in 1773, but there must have been one there from early times, as in an "Ordinatio vicarie de Stoke Prioris," dated 1390, it is stipulated that the vicar should receive the offerings made there. "Item percipiet oblationes factas in capella sancti Godwali." Value of the living, £310; viear. Rev. H. Aldham; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester; church accommodation, 650; free seats, 223.



 The Heraldry of Worcestershire: Being a Roll of the Arms Borne by the ... - Page 345
 by Henry Sydney Grazebrook - Worcestershire (England) - 1873


 LILLY, of Bromsgrove, Stoke Prior, and London.---This family did not appear at any of the Visitations; but it appears, from a pedigree in the Harl. MS., 1566, that -------Lilly, of Bromsgrove, had two sons,-------Lilly, and Thomas Lilly (of whom presently).  The former had issue(with a daughter, Margarett, married to Richard Bradley), three sons:---Gilbert, of London, merchant tailor, who had a daughter, Judith; Reginald, of Bromsgrove, who, by Margaret, his wife, daughter of -----Bradley, of Stourbridge, had Gilbert, of Bromsgrove, Nicholas and William, of Alvechurch, all married, and a daughter, Margaret, wife of Francis Knight; and Thomas, of Worcester, who had three sons, Richard, of Worcester, Edmund, of London, and William.  Thomas Lilly, of Bromsgrove, above named, had issue (with daughters) three sons:---John, who purchased lands in Warwickshire; Richard; and Thomas, of Stoke Prior.  The latter was twice married: first to Philippa, daughter of Thomas Marshall, and secondly, to Jane, daughter and co-heiress of -----Hemming, to Jane, daughter and co-heiress of -----Hemming, of the Vale of Evesham.  By the latter he had issue a son, Edward, of London, who had a son, George; and by the former he had:---Richard, who died s.p.; Thomas, who had a son, Henry; George, of Wilkin, who had a daughter, Sarah; and John, of London, who married Mary, daughter of John Gabbett, and had two sons, John and Henry.  The latter,(Henry), was of London, pursuivant of arms; he married Elizabeth, daughter of ----Flynt of Fisherton,co. Wilts.


 Homes of Family Names in Great Britain - Page 405
 by Henry Brougham Guppy - Names, Personal British - 1890

 There is a Warwickshire parish of the name.....HEMMING or HEMING, a name having its present home in the Evesham district, is an Anglo-Saxon clan name.  It was well known in Worcester in the 17th century, Richard Heming being the name of the mayor of the city in 1627 and 1657, and John Heming in 677 (G.); the name is still in that city. One of the name was buried in Tenbury church in 1691 (N.)  It is also now represented in Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, and Warwickshire, sometimes in the form of Hemmings.  Last century there was a Gloucestershire family of the name in Barrigton Parva (Bigland's "Gloucestershire")


The heraldry of Worcestershire - Page 345 -
Henry Sydney Grazebrook - 1873
LILLY, of Bromsgrove, Stoke Prior, and London---This family did not appear at any of the Visitations; but it appears, from a pedigree in the Harl. MS., 1566, that ____Lilly, of Bromsgrove, had two sons, ____Lilly, and Thomas Lilly (of whom presently). The former had issue (with a daughter, Margaret, married to Richard Bradley), three sons: Gilbert, of London, merchant tailor, who had a daughter, Judith; Reginald, of Bromsgrove, who, by Margaret, his wife, daughtr of ____Bradley, of Stourbridge, had Gilbert, of Bromsgrove, Nicholas and William, of Alvechurch, all married, and a daughtr, Margaret, wife of Francis Knight; and Thomas, of Worcester, who had three sons, Richard, of Worcester, Edmund, of London, and William. Thomas Lilly, of Bromsgrove above named, had issue (with daughters) three sons:--John, who purchased lands in Warwickshire; Richard; and Thomas, of Stoke Prior. The latter was twice married; first to Philippa, daughtr of Thomas Marshall, and secondly, to Jane, daughter and co-heiress of ___Hemming, of the Vale of Evesham. By the latter he had issue a son, Edward, of London, who had a son, George; and by the former he had: Richard, who died s.p.; Thomas, who had a son, Henry; George, of Wikin, who had a daughter, Sarah; and John, of London, who married Mary, daughter of John Gabbett, and had two sons, John and Henry. The latter, (Henry,) was of London, pursuivant of arms; he married Elizabeth daughter of ___Flynt, of Fisherton, co. Wilts, and by her, who died September 10th, 1635, had issue two children, Henry and Elizabeth. William Lilly, of Alvechurch, above named, (son of Reginald Lilly, of Bromsgrove), married Christian, daughter of ___Thompson, of Suffolk, and had issue, Reginald, Nicholas, Gilbert, and Margaret. The children (if any) of his brothers, Gilbert and Nicholas, are not given in the manuscript.--Ermine, a lion rampant azure; also Gules, three lilies slipped argent. Crests: A swan's head erased argent, and, A heart gules, winged or, ensigned with a fleur-de-lis of the last. (Harl. MSS., 1450, 1566, 5814l and Penn MS.)



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