Thursday, November 5, 2009

John De Bohun and Anne Halsham

Sir John De Bohun was born January 6, 1361/62 and died January 25, 1431.32 and was buried in Easebourne Priory.He was the son of John De Bohun and Cecily De Filliol He married first Alice. After she died he married second, Anne/Joane Halsham (died 1448). She was the daughter of John Halsham, of West Grinsted and Applesham, Sussex, England by his wife Maud Mawle.


John succeeded as Lord Bohun 5 December 1367. He was never summoned to Parliament. He received livery of his inheritance 2 February 1383.84. He lived at Midhurst, Sussex, England and at Rockingham Castle, England.

John and his first wife Alice had one son named Humphrey(1418-1469)(He married Margaret Estfield); and a daughter named Beatrice(1416-1446). She died after 14 December 1419 and was buried Easebourne Priory.


He married his second wife Anne Halsham before 25 October 1429 .

Children:

1. John De Bohun born abour 1433 in Wales or Midhurst, Sussex, England married Avelina De Ros. She was the daughter of his stepfather Robert De Ros. Some sources state that they were half-siblings. A wikipedia article says that Avelina's parents were Robert De Ros (c.1213-13 May 1285) and Isabel D'Albini/Aubigny, but it does not mention Robert De Ros being married to Anne Halsham. I don't think this is correct, because the other children of Isabel D'Albini and that Robert de Ros were born between 1244 and the middle of the century circa 1250-65. However, they did have a son also named Robert de Ros, who would have been more the correct age.


After John died, Anne married Sir Robert Roos/Ros of More End, Northamptonshire. He was keeper of Rockingham Castle. He died 30 December 1448 and she was still living 24 November 1449.

The father of Sir John III, Sir John II was born Jan.6, 1361/62 and died Jan. 25, 1431/32. After his first wife, Alice, died, Sir John married Anne Halsham (d.1448), the mother of SirJohn III, before 1361. Anne’s parents were John Halsham and Maud Mawle. Sir John de Bohun II



Sir John de Bohun succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord Bohun [E., 1359] on 5 December 1367, by writ, although he was never summoned to Parliament.1 On 2 February 1383/84 he had livery of his inheritance.1 He lived in Midhurst, Sussex, England.1

Citations

1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 201. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Sir John de Bohun/Anne Halsham Resided in Rockingham Castle, Northants, England. He was never called to Parliament in recognition of his Barony. http://www.garylavergne.com/boone.htm


Magna Carta Ancestry
By Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham

John Bohun, Knt., of Midhurst, Sussex, etc., 1st surviving son and heir, by his father's 2nd marriage, born 6 June 1362/3. He married (1st) Alice_____. They had one son, Humphrey, Knt., and one daughter, Beatrice. She was living 14 Dec 1419, and was buried in Easebourne Priory.
He married (2nd) before 25 Oct 1429 Anne Halsham, daughter and in her issue heiress of John Halsham, of West Grinstead and Applesham, Sussex, by his 2nd wife, Maud Mawley. Sir John De Bohun died 25 Jan 1432/3, and was buried in Easebourne Priory. His widow, Anne, married (2nd) in 1433 Robert Roos, Knt., of More End, Northamptonshire, Keeper of Rockingham Castle (died 30 Dec 1448). She was living 24 Nov 1449


Notes and Queries - Google Books Result
by William White - 1879

Shows a tree for Joan Halsham and spells Johns name as Bowne


A history of the castles, mansions, and manors of western Sussex - Google Books Result
by Dudley George Cary Elwes, Charles John Robinson - 1876

This book gives a pedigree and says:
West Grinstead

Of the early history of this parish (which is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey) we have no authentic account. It formed part of the lordship of Bram- ber,* and does not seem to have been made a separate manor until the beginning of the 15th century, when-f- it was settled upon John Halsham and Matilda his wife, with certain remainders. But it is evident that the lords of Bramber retained their paramount rights, and when Halsham's manor was surrendered into the King's hands in 1417,+ the former were not affected thereby. In fact, we find that even as late as 1578, some of the lands in West Grinstead were held of the Honour of Bramber by fealty, and others of the Crown by knights' service, and we may infer from this that the latter included the manor which had been granted to John Halsham. What we may call the Crown manor was granted to Thomas West, Lord de la Warr, on the accession of Henry VII., but retained by him only three years. And before the year 1504. both manors (probably united) appear to have passed into the possession of Sir Henry Roos, knt. who bequeathed them to his wife Matilda, after whose death, in 1511, they devolved to his grandchild Elizabeth, dau. of Marmaduke Gorges (her son by a previous husband), and wife of Thomas Shirley.^ (See sub Wiston.) From the Shirleys they passed by bequest to Sir George Snelling, who married Cecilia, eld. dau. of Thomas Shirley || (a Calvinist of an extreme type), and'about the year 1607 were sold to Sir Edward Caryll, knt., the head of an old Roman Catholic family of high standing in the county. Philippa Caryl, granddaughter of the purchaser, and widow of Henry, Lord Morley and Monteagle, joined with her son, Thomas, Lord Morley, in settling the estate on Richard Caryl of Harting, the fortunes of whose descendants, marred by too close a devotion to the cause of the Stuarts, will be recounted upon a subsequent page.


By John Caryl—heir to Pope's friend, the Caryl of The Rape of the Lock, and also to the empty title bestowed by the Pretender upon his ancestor*—the estate was sold for ^10,780, in the year 1744, to Sir Merrik Burrell, Bart.,-)~ from whom it has descended to Sir Walter W. Burrell, Bart., its present possessor.

The ancient manor house of West Grinstead stood near the centre of the Park, and was surrounded by a moat. It gave place to a large brick mansion which the Caryls erected, and to which Pope's occasional visits lent some sort of interest. Sir Merrik Burrell refaced this house, but about the year 1809 it was entirely taken down, and part of the ancient wainscot transferred to the present mansion—one of Nash's domestic castles—which had been built by Walter Burrell upon a higher site within the park. All that can be said of it is, that it contains some well-proportioned rooms and these some good pictures. Surrounding it is a deer park, 300 acres in extent, and remarkable for its fine maple trees.

An old manor house, near the church, still bears the name of Clothails, which it gave to an ancient family residing here in the i5th century.| The estate has passed through the hands of the Wiltshires, Bellinghams, Boys, Lambs and Ferrises, and now belongs to Sir Walter W. Burrell.

DaUingfoId, sometime belonging to the free chapel of St. Leonard, was held in the reign of Qu. Elizabeth by Roger Gratwicke, of Itford," of the Queen and of her manor of Stokenham, co. Devon." It was inherited in 1570 by Richard Gratwicke.

Bidlington and Kingsbarns manors, lying chiefly in West Grinstead, came to the Gorings as part of the estates of the Shelleys of Wiston, and to them has been lately added by the Rev. John Goring, the present owner of Wiston, the reputed manor of Champions,for more than two centuries the property of the Ward family.*

From the submanor of Syne an ancient family took its name, many members of which were benefactors to Sele Priory in the i4th century."}- The name still survives in Byne Farm, Byne Bridge, Prior's Byne, &c.

The Church is rich in monumental remains, conspicuous among which are two brasses, one commemorating Philippa (de Strabolgi) wife of John Halsham, (1395) ; the other Sir Hugh Halsham, knt. (144.1), and Joyce his wife, 1421.

* As such it was involved in the same contention as Kndon (which see), and like it was held in succession by the Braoses, Mowbrays and Howards

+ Close Roll 18 Hen. VI., m. 16, recites a grant dated 20 Aug., 4 Hen. IV. [1403], from Sir W. Percy and Sir W. Burcestre (husband to Margaret, wid. of Thos. de Braose, lord paramount of W. Gr.) and others of the manors of Apple- sham and Grinstead, to hold to the said John Halsham and Matilda his wife in tail male, with remainder to Richard and Hugh, sons of said John in tail male ; in default of male issue to heirs of the body of said John, and again in default to right heirs. (See Pedigree iff Halsham.)

+ Thus, in the same Subsidy Roll (13 Hen. IV.), the manor of W. Giinstead is returned as +belonging to Gerard Ufflete in right of his wife, Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, and also occurs among the possessions of John Halsham. Under what circumstances the Jurors surrendered the manor into the hands of the King on the death of John Halsham we are unable to ascertain.

§ As these particulars escaped the notice of Mr. Cartwright, it may be as well to state that Sir Henry Roos, knt., of West Grinstead, was the third husband of Matilda (whose maiden name is unknown), she having married successively Richard Harbord and Richard Gorges (son of Sir Theobald Gorges of Wraxall, co. Som.). By the latter she had issue an only son, Marmaduke Gorges, born 1472, d. 20 June, 1509, leaving (by his wife Margaret) 2 daus., viz.: Elizabeth, w. of Thomas Shirley, and Matilda, w. of Edw. Ludlow. By award of Chf. Justice Lyster, 38 Hen. VIII., W. Grin- stead was assigned to the elder dau., and certain lands in Somerset to Matilda Ludlow.

|| Sir George Snelling married Cecilia Shirley at St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, 12 July, 1606, and was bur. at W. Grin- stead, 16 Apr., 1617. The Register of the latter parish records the baptism of Sir George's son and heir, Shirley Snelling (7 Apr., 1607), and the burial (2 Nov., 1628) of Sir George's widow, who had married William Blunt. The sale of W. Grinstead to Sir Edw. Caryl must have taken place during Sir George Snelling's life, as Sir Edward predeceased him in 1609

* As will be best seen in the pedigree, given under Warnham, the common ancestor of the Carylls of Halting, Warnham and West Grinstead, was Sir John Caryll, who was Serjeant at Law to Hen, VIII. Philippa, Lady Monteagle, died in 1657, and it would seem that W. Grinstead, which thtn passed according to settlement to the Carylls of Harting, was enjoyed by Mary, widow of John Caryl and mother of Richard, until her death in 1682. (See Washington.)

t It was left by Sir Merrik to Mrs. Isabella \Vyatt, with remainder to Walter Burrell, 2nd son of his nephew, Sir William Bumll, Bart.

I In 6 Hen. VI. the heir of John Clothall held one-fourth part of a knight's fee here, and 11 Hen. VI., one John Clot- hall held two parts of one fee. dntj. p.m. John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, 11 Hen. VI., No. 43.) Clothall is said, by the Rev. Edw. Turner, S.A.C. xxii., p. 9, to have been the residince of the Halshams, but on what authority does not appear.


Nottinghamshire History
http://www.nottshistory.org.uk/articles/tts/tts1921/dunham1.htm

Aymer de Valentia had a half sister, Joan, who married John Cumin of Badinock. They both died before Aymer, leaving two daughters, Joan and Elizabeth. Joan, the elder of the two, who was heir-at-law to the Manor of Dunham, married David de Strabolgi, tenth earl of Athole, who died in 1326. They had a son David, aged nineteen at the time of his father's death, who married Katherine, daughter of the Earl of Buchan. He was killed at the siege of Kildrummy Castle in 1334, at the age of twenty-seven. He left a son who became twelfth Earl of Athole, who was also called David. This last earl of the family fought with the Black Prince in France, sat in the English Parliament, and died in 1375. He was heir-at-law to the Manor of Dunham. He married Elizabeth, relict of Lord Ferrers of Groby. She died 1376. They had no son, but left two daughters, aged fourteen and twelve respectively, Elizabeth and Philippa, the elder of whom, on the death of Maria de Sancto Paulo in 1377, became Lady of the Manor.

The two daughters of the twelfth Earl of Athole, orphaned at such an early age, married brothers, sons of the Earl of Northumberland. Sir Ralph Percy, who married Philippa de Strabolgi, was taken prisoner, with his eldest brother, by the renowned Hotspur, at the

Battle of Otterburn or Chevy Chase, and died without issue.

Apparently John Halsham abducted Philippa, the wife of Sir Ralph Percy, in 1384; her first marriage was annulled and they married in 1384. She died in 1395. He then married Maud/Matilda Mawley. They both had sons named John. John Sr. was a poet
The Middle English lyric and short poem‎ - Page 110
Rosemary Greentree - Poetry - 2001




In the British Museum Addit. MS. 34360 on folio 22 occurs one stanza of rime royal entitled "The question of halsham." It is smooth in meter, well-balanced in thought, and practically perfect un stanza form, comparing very favourably in these respects with other minor lyrics of the early fifteenth century. The popularity of this poem is attested by its presence in many manuscripts of that century and by the fact that Caxton printed it together with a second seven-line stanza also ascribed to Halsham. Both of these lyrics are found in Bodley 3896, f. 195a (MS. Fairfax 16), which affords not only the earliest, but the most authentic text of these pieces:

The worlde so wide/ thaire so remuable
The sely man/so litel of stature
The grove and grounde/ of clothinge so mutable
The fire so hoote/ and subtil of nature
The water neuer in oon/ what creature
That made is of these foure/ thus flyttyng
May stedfast be as here/ in his lyving

The more I goo/ the ferther I am behinde
The ferther behinde/ the ner my wayes ende
The more I seche/ be worse kan I fynde
The lighter leve/ the loter for to wende
The bet y serve/ the more al out of mynde
Is thys ffortune not I/ or infortune
Though I go lowse/tyed am I with a Lune

The first lyric or stanza occurs alone in Brit. Mus. Addit. 34360, f. 22a, and with the second in five manuscrips: Bodley 3896, f. 195a:
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