Sunday, November 1, 2009

John De Bohun and Cecily Filliol

John De Bohun, Lord of Midhurst, was born 14 November 1301 in Todham, Easebourne, Sussex, England and died 5 December 1367. He was the son of James De Bohun and Joan De Braose. He married 1st Isabel de Tregoz before 1326. She died before 1342; and 2nd Cicely Filliol 6 November 1342. Cicely Filliol was born about 1324 Woodland, Durham, England and died August 1381 Exeter, Devon, England. She was the daughter of John Filliol and his wife Margery.

John had children by Isabel de Tregoz:

1.Edward De Bohun

2. Elizabeth De Bohun married Henry Hussey

3. Eve De Bohun

4. Joan De Bohun married John De Lisle

5. John De Bohun


John De Bohun and Cecily Filliol had one son:

1. John De Bohun born 6 January 1359/60 Cowdray, Sussex, England and died 25 January 1431/31. He married 1. Anne/Joan Halsham 2. Alice





The father of Sir John II, John I was born Jan 6, 1300/01 and died Dec. 5, 1367. After the death of his first wife, Isabel de Trego, Sir John married, Cicely Filliol, mother of SirJohn II and daughter of Sir John Filliol, before 1361. Sir John de Bohun I was a Baron by writ of lands in England and Ireland. ie., He was Lord of Midhurst, Ford, Sussex, and Rustington in England and inherited his grandmother’s lands in Ballymadd Co. Kildar, Ireland. In retinue of Earl of Arundel in French Wars. Member Parliament as Baron of Midhurst. Sir John’s parents were James de Bohun II and Joan de Braose.
Accompanied King Edward III to Ireland, 1331, & to France, 1346.
Created Lord Bohun by writ 10 OCT 1359
---
SIR JOHN DE BOHUN, of Midhurst, &c., son and heir born and baptized 14 November 1301 at Todham in Easebourne, Sussex. Having proved his age, he did homage, and had livery of his lands in England and Ireland, 20 May 1323. In July 1346, he, in the retinue of the Earl of Arundel, accompanied the King in his French campaign, returning to England before 14 May 1347. He was summoned to three Councils from 10 October 1359 to 10 February 1361/2, and to Parliament from 1 June 1363 to 20 January 1365/6, by writs directed Johanni de Bohun de Midhurst, whereby he may be held to have become LORD BOHUN, but none of his descendants were ever summoned to Parliament in respect of this Barony.
He married, 1stly, before 1326, Isabel, perhaps daughter of Sir Henry DE TREGOZ, of Goring, Sussex.
He married, 2ndly, before 6 November 1342, Cicely, only daughter and eventual heir of Sir John FILLIOL, of Kelvedon, Little Oakley, and Little Baddow, Essex, by his 2nd wife Margery.
He died 5 December 1367, aged 66.
His widow, who was aged 22 and more in October 1346, died 9 or 13 August 1381.
[CP 2:200-01]
---
In 1428 it is stated that the 1/2 fee in Todham, formerly of William Chamberlayn and others, 'is divided between three persons equally', these being Thomas Tawke, John Strode, and John Bown. Tawke represents the St. George estate, Strode was perhaps a tenant of the Arundel lands, and John 'Bown' or Bohun represents a third division. This seems to have been in the hands of the family in 1300, as John son of James de Bohun was born at the manor of Todham in that year. In 1381 Cecily widow of Sir John de Bohun died seised of Hetfeldlond, held of Robert Tawke as of his manor of Todham. This may perhaps be the 100 acres in Todham, valued at £10, which was in the hands of Viscount Montague at his death in 1629.


0 May 1323 he did homage and had livery of his lands in England and Ireland.1 In July 1346 he accompanied the King to France, as part of the retinue of the Earl of Arundel, and returned to England 14 May 1347.1 He was created 1st Lord Bohun [England by writ] on 10 October 1359, although none of his descendants were ever summoned to Parliament.1 He lived in Midhurst, Sussex, England.1

Citations

1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 200. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 201.
Sir John de Bohun/Cicely Filliol Baron by writ of lands in England and Ireland. He was in the retinue of the Earl of Arundel during the French Wars. He was a member of Parliament as Baron of Midhurst.
http://www.garylavergne.com/boone.htm


From a post on Gen-Medieval mailing list at yahoo

On Jul 12, 4:55 pm, Douglas Richardson
Dear Ken ~

Thank you for your good post. Much appreciated.

In answer to your excellent question, yes, Sir John de Bohun, of
Midhurst, Sussex, was born at Todham (in Easebourne), Sussex 14 Nov.
1301. Sir John de Bohun was married twice, his second wife being
Cecily Filiol, who was born about 1324 (aged 22 in 1346). And, yes,
their son and heir was John de Bohun the younger, born at Cowdray,
Sussex 6 Jan. 1362/3.

The record below which is taken from the National Archives catalogue
bears that out:

C 136/34/15

Record Summary
Scope and content
John son and heir of John de Bohun, knight, of Midhurst and of Cecily
his wife: Sussex (writ only, proof of age missing)
Covering dates 7 Rich II [1383-1384]. END OF QUOTE.

The above record may be viewed at the following weblink:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails....

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah


Magna Carta Ancestry
By Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham
John Bohun, Knt., of Midhurst, Ford, and Rustington, Susse, and Ballymadden, co., Kildare, Ireland, son and heir, born at Todham (in Easebourne), Susse 14 Nov. 1301. He married (1st) before 1326 Isabel_____, perhaps daughter of Henry de Tregoz, Knt., of Goring, Susse. They had two sons, Edward and John, and three daughters, Joan (wife of John de Lisle), Eve, and Elizabeth (wife of Henry Hussey). On 23 July 1329 he had livery of the inheritance of Joan, widow of his grandfather, John de Bohun. He married (2nd) before 6 Nov. 1342 Cecily Filoll (or Fillioll), daughter and eventual heiress of John Filoll, Knt., of Kelvedon, Little Oakley, and Little Baddow, Essex, by his 2nd wife, Margery. She was born about 1324 (aged 22 in 1346). They had one son, John, Knt. In the retinue of the Earl of Arundel, he accompanied the King in July 1346 in his French campaign. He was summoned to three Councils from 10 Oct. 1359 by writs directed Johanni de Bohun de Midhurst. Sir John Bohun died 5 Dec. 1367. His widow, Cecily, died 9 (or 13) August 1381.

MANORS

It has already been suggested that Easebourne, of which Midhurst was originally part, may have been a demesne manor of Earl Roger accidentally omitted in the Domesday Survey. (fn. 43) At the beginning of the 12th century MIDHURST was given by Henry I, to whom the honor of Arundel had escheated, to Savaric fitz Cane, to hold with its appurtenances as 3 knights' fees. (fn. 44) He married Muriel, apparently daughter of Richard de Meri who had married Lucy eventual heiress of the seigneurie of Bohun. Savaric left three sons: Ralph died without surviving issue in 1159; his brothers Savaric and Geldewin in 1158 made an agreement by which Midhurst passed to the latter. On the death of Savaric fitz Savaric early in, or shortly before, 1187 Geldewin inherited the whole of his father's lands and also those of his mother's brother Enjuger de Bohun, who had died in 1180. Geldewin died about the end of 1187 and was succeeded by his eldest son Frank de Bohun, who incurred the enmity of Henry II, probably through his support of the king's son Richard, as the latter in 1190 annulled an agreement which King Henry had forced Frank to make with Ralph de Arderne and confirmed him in possession of his estates, including Midhurst. (fn. 45) Frank died in 1192 and his widow Rohese paid 300 marks to have the custody of his lands and of his sons. (fn. 46) The elder of these, Enjuger, was marshal for Normandy in 1213 and died at the end of 1218, when he was planning a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. (fn. 47) His brother and heir Savaric died in 1246, about which time his son Sir Frank married Sibyl daughter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby; (fn. 48) he married secondly Nichole widow of Bartholomew de la Chapelle, to whom the manor of Midhurst was allotted after his death in 1273. Sir John, his eldest son by his first wife, married Joan, his step-sister, daughter of Bartholomew and Nichole, and died in 1284, leaving three sons, of whom the eldest was only 9. Shortly before his death Sir John had granted Midhurst to Anthony Beck, Bishop of Durham, for life, with remainder to his own children. The bishop survived until 1311, by which time Sir John's eldest son John had died (c. 1296), as had the second son James (fn. 49) (1306). The latter's son John, born at Todham, was still a child when the bishop died, and custody of 2/3 of the manor of Midhurst (the other ⅓ being held by Sir John's widow) was granted to Sir Henry Percy. (fn. 50) John died in 1367, leaving a son John, born at Cowdray in 1363, who lived till 1433. His son Sir Humphrey died in 1460, and his son John Bohun, who died in 1492, was the last male of his line. He left two daughters, of whom the younger, Ursula, married Sir Robert Southwell and died without issue, so that Midhurst and the other Bohun estates passed to Mary and her husband Sir David Owen, a bastard son of Owen Tudor, the grandfather of Henry VII.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41704

As early as 1384 dower was assigned to Cecily widow of Sir John de Bohun in 'the manor of Midhurst called Coderay'. (fn. 51) From the time when Sir David Owen began the building of the great house the manor, as distinct from the borough, of Midhurst was often called COWDRAY. In 1528 Sir David sold the Bohun estates to Sir William Fitzwilliam, reserving the right to live at Cowdray, but permitting Sir William to build there, provided he was not inconvenienced by the work. (fn. 52) His son Sir Henry Owen pointed out that Sir David had only a life interest, but himself conveyed the reversion to Sir William. (fn. 53) The latter, created Earl of Southampton in 1537, died in 1542 and left the estates to his half-brother Sir Anthony Browne. He died in 1548 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Anthony, who was created Viscount Montague in 1554 and lived until 1592. His eldest son having died shortly before him, Midhurst and Cowdray passed to his grandson Anthony Maria and from him in unbroken succession to George Samuel, 8th Viscount Montague, who was drowned in 1793 when rashly attempting to shoot the rapids of the Rhine. As he left no issue the estates passed to his sister Elizabeth Mary, who married William Stephen Poyntz. He died in 1840, leaving three daughters, by whom the property was sold to the 6th Earl of Egmont. From the 8th Earl it was bought in 1908 by Sir Weetman Pearson, created Baron Cowdray in 1910 and Viscount in 1917, and is now held by the 3rd Viscount.

Tenements in Midhurst and land in neighbouring parishes were granted to the Knights Hospitallers, presumably by one of the Bohuns. (fn. 54) Accordingly, in 1278 the prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem successfully claimed for his tenants here a long list of liberties and exemptions, except that it was found that they were at scot and lot with the other men of the town in matters pertaining to the Crown. (fn. 55) In 1338 the Hospitallers had a grange in Midhurst with 50 acres of arable and a rood of meadow, let for 13s. 4d., and pasturage for 100 sheep, worth 8s. 4d. (fn. 56) The estates were under the Commandery of Poling and constituted the LIBERTY OF ST. JOHN. A chapel was built, and this with its estates was leased in 1515 for forty-one years to Robert Gybrisshe at a rent of 33s. 4d., he doing all repairs and finding a priest to celebrate four times in the year. (fn. 57) He was also responsible for the ornaments, which included a silvergilt chalice and paten, and vestments. Before the lease expired the Hospital had been suppressed, and in June 1561 the manor and chapel, with tenements in West and North Streets, &c., were granted to the Earl of Southampton. (fn. 58) The manor of St. John's then descended with the manor of Midhurst, each being valued at £20 in 1629. (fn. 59)



BOHUN—BARONS BOHUN OF MID-
HURST.

By Writ of Summons, dated 1st June, 1363.
37th Edward III.

Lineage.

In addition to the illustrious house of Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton, there was another family of the same name, and probably descended from the same source, whose chief seat was at Midhurst, in the county of Sussex. In the reign of King Henry III.

SAVARIE DE BOHUN held three knights'fees in Ford and Midhurst, and had to wife, , sister of John Fitz Geffrey, Justice of Ireland, by whom he had issue,

FRANCO DE BOHUN, whom. Sibel, one of the daughters of William de Ferrars, Earl of Derby, by Sibel, his wife, daughter to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, and sister and co-heiress of Anselm, Earl of Pembroke, by whom he had a son and successor,

JOHN DE BOHUN, serjeant of the king's Chapel, and spigumel, that is, sealer of the writs, temp. Edward I. In the twelfth year of which reign he d., leaving with other children, his successor,

JAMES DE BOHUN, whom, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of William de Braose, of Gower, and was s. by his son,

JOHN DE BOHUN, who making proof of his age, and doing homage, had livery of his lands in the 16th Edward II. " This is he, (says Dugdale.) who for his great services in Flanders, and elsewhere beyond sea, in 14th Edward III., (when the king first laid claim to the crown of France,) as also in that famous expedition into France, 19th Edward III., (shortly after which, the king obtained that glorious victory at Cressey, whereof our historians make ample mention.) became afterwards one of the Barons of the realm, being summoned to sit in parliament, in 37th, 38th, and 39th of that king's reign." His lordship m. first, Isabel , by whom he had two daughters,
viz.

Joane, m. to John de L'Isle, of Gatcombe.
Еvе.

The baron m, secondly, Cecely, daughter and heiress of John Filllol, of Essex, and left a son and heir,

JOHN DE BOHUN, who attaining majority in the 7th Richard II., and doing his homage, had livery of his lands; but he does not appear ever to have been summoned to parliament as a baron, neither were his descendants considered as such. He was s. by his son, Humphrey


A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and ...‎ - Page 63
by John Burke - History - 1831

BOHUN—BARONS BOHUN OF MID-
HURST.

By Writ of Summons, dated 1st June, 1363.
37th Edward III.

Lineage.

In addition to the illustrious house of Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton, there was another family of the same name, and probably descended from the same source, whose chief seat was at Midhurst, in the county of Sussex. In the reign of King Henry III.

SAVARIE DE BOHUN held three knights'fees in Ford and Midhurst, and had to wife, , sister of John Fitz Geffrey, Justice of Ireland, by whom he had issue,

FRANCO DE BOHUN, whom. Sibel, one of the daughters of William de Ferrars, Earl of Derby, by Sibel, his wife, daughter to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, and sister and co-heiress of Anselm, Earl of Pembroke, by whom he had a son and successor,

JOHN DE BOHUN, serjeant of the king's Chapel, and spigumel, that is, sealer of the writs, temp. Edward I. In the twelfth year of which reign he d., leaving with other children, his successor,

JAMES DE BOHUN, whom, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of William de Braose, of Gower, and was s. by his son,

JOHN DE BOHUN, who making proof of his age, and doing homage, had livery of his lands in the 16th Edward II. " This is he, (says Dugdale.) who for his great services in Flanders, and elsewhere beyond sea, in 14th Edward III., (when the king first laid claim to the crown of France,) as also in that famous expedition into France, 19th Edward III., (shortly after which, the king obtained that glorious victory at Cressey, whereof our historians make ample mention.) became afterwards one of the Barons of the realm, being summoned to sit in parliament, in 37th, 38th, and 39th of that king's reign." His lordship m. first, Isabel , by whom he had two daughters,
viz.

Joane, m. to John de L'Isle, of Gatcombe.
Еvе.

The baron m, secondly, Cecely, daughter and heiress of John Filllol, of Essex, and left a son and heir,

JOHN DE BOHUN, who attaining majority in the 7th Richard II., and doing his homage, had livery of his lands; but he does not appear ever to have been summoned to parliament as a baron, neither were his descendants considered as such. He was s. by his son, Humphrey


THE MANOR OF FILLIOLS OR FELIX HALL

Felix Hall Kelvedon Essex

After the Norman Conquest in 1066 the Saxon thane, Gudmund, gave way to Hugh de Montfort whose under-tenant was William son of Grosse.

At the taking down of the Domesday Survey in 1085 this estate was held for a manor and three and a half hides (420 acres) of arable. There were two teams in the demesne and one between the nine villeins. There were five bordars and three serfs; wood for 50 swine, 25 acres of meadow, a mill, two horses and 140 sheep.

It is believed that this Manor then included that of Bradwell, near Coggeshall, which was held of Filliols Hall until 1375.

Soon after the Conquest it was held by the Filliol family whose name appears on the Roll of Battle Abbey in Sussex. 'They came with the Conqueror'. Meaning godson it is often said that the original Filliol was either a bastard child or godson of William I. This however is not likely. The family was established near Argentan in France, a branch was living for many centuries in the Channel Islands and several branches formed in England. There were Filliols in Kelvedon long after the Manor had left their hands through a female heiress.

According to the Pipe Rolls, Baldwin Filliol held three knight's fees in Kelvedon in 1206 and in 1216, the first year of the reign of King Henry III. As a result of a series of marriages the family collected other Manors or lands in Coggeshall, Feering, Great Braxted, Inworth, Messing, Bradwell, Eastthorpe, Copford, Great Briche, Tolleshunt Tregoz, Tolleshunt Knights, Terling, Baddow, Bergholt, Little Oakley and Boreham.

The Filliols were likely to have been rarely in Kelvedon for they were constantly engaged, during the 13th and 14th centuries, in fighting against the French, the Scots or the Welsh. In 1346 the Manor passed to Sir John de Bohun of Midhurst, Sussex, through his marriage to Cecily Filliol. It passed 200 years later, again by marriage, to Sir Robert Southwell who died childless. In 1539 King Henry VIII gave it to the Long family after which it went, through marriage, to Sir William Russell, later Baron Thornhaugh, who sold it to Sir Thomas Cecil, younger son of the Earl of Exeter. It was resold in 1630 to Anthony Abdy, an eminent merchant of London — though of Yorkshire origins — whose three sons became baronets. The eldest, Sir Thomas Abdy of Felix (Filliols) Hall died in 1685, his son Sir Anthony in 1704 and Sir Anthony II (grandson) in 1733, whose daughter Charlotte married in 1744 John Williams, Esq., of Tendring Hall. John sold it in 1761 to Daniel Mathews, Esq. After other owners, it was bought in 1796 by Charles Callis Western, Esq., of Rivenhall, (later to be Lord Western), whose ancestors had been successful iron merchants in London.

The Extent of the Manor

By this time the territories held by the Filliols, De Bohuns and Abdys had diminished considerably. In Kelvedon itself the demesne land included the area of Felix Park as far as Upney Wood and Holdshotts (or Allshots) Farm, the present Monks Farm and Park Farm. Also on the rent-roll, some of them freehold, were the old Angel Inn, Strutts, a house opposite the bottom of Rowley Lane, a tenement and shop north-east of Dowches (probably Shepherds, etc.), a tenement called Gages (now the White House and Gages), and a house called Strogulls with orchard opposite the old Star and Fleece. Then there was a house (now Chambers, Gables, Dormers etc.) with a 20-acre farm behind it going down to the river; finally, the area round Grey's Mill, Bridgefoot Farm, and, further away, the present Hole Farm, formerly the Moors.

The Survey of 1636

An abstract from the Survey of the Manor of Felix Hall taken in 1636 shows the demesne land to have been apportioned as follows:

1. Sir Anthony Abdy Bt. (who had recently purchased the Manor). 76 acres with 124 acres of woodland and five acres of meadow. Potal: 205 acres.

2. John Roughton. A tenement with yard, and five acres in Longcroft, Great Haywards and Little Haywards. Total: 76 acres.

3. William Henry. A dwelling house, and 14 crofts including Harding Hills near Upney Wood, Hallfield, Poundfieid and Molehill.Total: 260 acres.

4. Thomas Fishpoole. A house, and 12 crofts including Barnfield, Fanners, Upper and Lower Holdshots and Poundfield. Total: 74 acres.

5. William Webb. A house, and 7 crofts and a piece of arable called the Park. Total: 39 acres.

6. John Yeoman. A piece of arabic near Thos. George, ditto near Rockpitt, a piece of meadow called Hogg meadow and other crofts. Total: 73 acres.

7. Mr. Bridgewood. A piece of arable called Rockpitt, and ditto called Bundocksfield. Total: 72 acres.

8. Thomas George. A cottage with 1 acre.

9. Robert Goswell. The sign of the Angel and meadow. Total in demesne: 750 acres.

http://www.maximiliangenealogy.co.uk/felixhall.html

British History Online
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=62594
The part of Crawley afterwards called Filliols Manor was known as such from the Filliol family, of whom William Filliol was fined 5 marks in 1175–6 for breach of the forest law. (fn. 79) He was succeeded by Baldwin Filliol, who in 1198 acquired 17 acres in Crawley from William Anketill, (fn. 80) and alienated 9 acres in 1202 to Bernard son of Hugh. (fn. 81) Baldwin was still alive in 1212, (fn. 82) but his heir Richard Filliol, (fn. 83) probably his son, (fn. 84) was in possession by 1249, (fn. 85) and held (fn. 86) until his death about 1260. (fn. 87) His son John, (fn. 88) who was presented by the hundered in 1275 for building a house on the highway, (fn. 89) exercised the manorial rights (fn. 90) until his death about 1317, when they vested in his nephew and heir John Filliol the elder. (fn. 91) He was sued by the Prior of Tickford in 1323, (fn. 92) and in 1324–5 settled the manor on himself and his wife Margery. (fn. 93) In 1327 the Filliols came to an arrangement with Robert and Paulina Broughton concerning a tenement in Great Crawley. (fn. 94) At John Filliol's death circa 1333 Richard, his son and heir, aged twelve, inherited some of the family property in Essex, but John, aged seven, his son by Margery (who survived), received the rest of the estate. (fn. 95) John Filliol the younger died without issue, (fn. 96) and at Margery's death in 1346 Cecily, then aged twenty-two, wife of John Bohun of Midhurst, was described as her only child and heir by John Filliol the elder.

The Tendring hundred in the olden time‎ - Page 175
by Joseph Yelloly Watson - 1877
LITTLE OAKLEY belonged partly to Robert Gernon, but chiefly -" to Ralph Baynard, Lord of Little Dunmow ; whose grandson William being deprived of his estates, they were given to Richard Fitzgilbert, ancestor of the Lords Fitzwalter. In the year 1259 Richard Filiol held Oakley of Robert Fitzwalter, and was succeeded by his son, Sir John Filiol. In the year 1331 Ralph Filiol passed the estate by fine to Sir John Filiol and Margery, his wife, and at the time of his decease, in 1332, he held the Manor of Little Oakley, with the advowson of the Church, of the heirs of Sir Robert Fitzwalter, by the service of two Knights' fees and a-half, and rent of 8s. 4d. a-year. Sir John, his sou and heir, left two sons; they died without issue, and the estates passed to their sister Cecily.

The name of Filiol occurs among the roll of the families who came over with the Conqueror, and is supposed to have been derived from Filiolus or filleul, a godson; for on a seal appended to a grant of William Filiol to Coggeshall Abbey, there is the representation of a font, with a King on one side and a Bishop on the other, holding a child as in the ceremony of baptism. Thus it is presumed the King stood sponsor to one of the family. The seat of this family in Essex was Filiols, now called Felix Hall, Kelvedon, and the property of the Westerns.* Robert Filiol, in the reign of Stephen, held lands in Leading Roding, and his brother and heir had issue four sons, one of whom, William, was the benefactor of Coggeshall Abbey. The family had three Knights' fees in Kelvedon, and estates at Coggeshall and Little Oakley. Cecily, to whom, as we have stated, the estates passed, married Sir John de Bohun, of Midhurst, in Sussex, who attended Edward III. at the battle of Cressy, and was summoned to Parliament in 1363, 1364, 1365.
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